Pacific Northwest Swimming
Hall of Fame
Class of 2004




On July 31, 2004 the Pacific Northwest Swimming Association inducted 19 new members into their Hall of Fame in Federal Way, Washington. The PNS Hall of Fame has three categories of members, swimmers, coaches and valuable contributors. This year eleven swimmers, 7 coaches and one contributor were honored.


Pictured is the class of 2004


  • Athlete: Mary Wayte Bradburne
    Mary Wayte was one of the US’s top middle distance swimmers in the 1980s. In the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, Mary won gold medals in the 200-meter freestyle and the 4 x 100-meter freestyle relay. At the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, Korea, Mary won a silver medal in the 4 x 100-meter medley relay and a bronze medal in the 4 x 100-meter freestyle relay. In addition to her medal wins, Mary was the fourth-place finisher in the 200-meter freestyle and she competed in the 200-meter individual medley. Mary won US National Championship titles in the 200-meter freestyle (summer, 1983), the 200-yard freestyle (spring, 1985), and the 200-meter freestyle (summer, 1985). She was a US National Team member in international competitions from 1981 to 1988. In the 1983 Pan American Games, Mary won a gold medal in the 4 x 100-meter freestyle relay and won the silver medal in the 200-meter freestyle. She won the silver medal in the 4 x 200-meter freestyle relay in the 1986 World Swimming Championships in Madrid, Spain. Representing the University of Florida, Mary was a two-time NCAA Champion in the 100-yard freestyle and the 400-meter individual medley. She was an NCAA All-American twenty-six times, which is an extraordinary feat. Residing on Mercer Island, Mary swam for Chinook Swim Club and was coached by Jack Ridley. Recognizing her exceptional swimming achievements, the Mary Wayte Pool on Mercer Island was named in her honor. Mary was inducted into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame in 1999 and the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 2000.


  • Athlete: Jo Harshbarger Carson
    Jo Harshbarger set a World Record in the 800-meter freestyle twice—once at the 1972 US Olympic Team Trials in Chicago, Illinois and then at the 1974 National Swimming Championships in Concord, California. Jo was a member of the 1972 US Olympic Team in Munich, Germany. Jo was a four-time U.S. National Champion. She won the 1500-meter freestyle in 1972, 1973, and 1975 and the 800-meter freestyle in 1972. Jo swam to a second-place finish in the 800-meter freestyle at the 1973 World Swimming Championships in Belgrade. Jo swam at Lake Washington Swim Club and was coached by Jack Ridley.


  • Athlete: Lynn Collela


    Lynn Colella, one of the Pacific Northwest’s highly talented swimmers, was the #1 ranked World 200-meter butterfly swimmer in 1969. She was the 200-meter butterfly silver medalist in the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, Germany. Lynn held the World Record in the short course 200-meter butterfly, as well as six American Records in the butterfly and breaststroke events. Lynn won ten National Championship titles in the 100-meter and 200-meter butterfly and breaststroke. Lynn was a US National Swim Team member in eleven international competitions. She won two bronze medals at the 1973 World Swimming Championships; two gold medals, one silver medal, and one bronze medal in the 1971 Pan American Games; and three gold medals in the 1970 World University Games. She was a three-event winner in the Women’s Collegiate Championships. Lynn swam at Cascade Swim Club, Totem Lakes Swim Club, and the University of Washington. She was coached by John Tallman and Earl Ellis.





  • Athlete: Rick Collela


    Rick Colella not only won six National Championship titles, but he held the rare and prestigious honor of being the high-point winner in three National Championships. Rick swam for the US in the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, Germany and in the 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal, Canada, where he won the silver medal in the 200-meter breaststroke. In the 1973 and 1975 World Swimming Championships, Rick won a gold medal, silver medal, and bronze medal in the 400-meter medley relay, the 200-meter breaststroke, and the 400-meter individual medley relay, respectively. In the same two years, Rick also won four gold medals and one silver medal in the Pan American Games. He won a gold medal and a silver medal in the 1970 World University Games in Turin, Italy. Rick swam at Cascade Swim Club and the University of Washington. He was coached by John Tallman, Bob Miller, and Earl Ellis.





  • Athlete: Kaye Hall Greff
    Kaye Hall, the first woman to break the 60-second barrier for the 100-yard backstroke, won two gold medals and a bronze medal in the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, Mexico. While winning the gold medals in the 100-meter backstroke and the 400-meter medley relay, Kaye also broke the World Records and Olympic Records in these events. She won her third Olympic medal in the 200-meter backstroke. During her swimming career, Kaye set six American Records. Kaye won three US National AAU Championships. She was a silver medalist in the 1967 Pan American Games. In 1969 Kaye won five Canadian National Championships (100-meter and 200-meter backstroke; the 100-meter and 200-meter freestyle; and the individual medley). Representing the University of Puget Sound, this All-American swimmer won three gold medals at the 1970 World University Games in Turin, Italy (backstroke; 400-meter freestyle relay; individual medley relay). Kaye, swimming for the Tacoma Swim Club, was coached by Dick Hannula. Kaye is a member of the University of Puget Sound Athletic Hall of Fame and the State of Washington Sports Hall of Fame. She was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1979.


  • Athlete: Jack Horsley


    Jack Horsley accomplished a very rare feat for a male swimmer—he qualified and medaled in an Olympic Games prior to his senior year in high school. At the 1968 US Olympic Team Trials, Jack broke the American Record in the 200-meter backstroke and won the bronze medal in that event at the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City. Also in 1968, he became the National Champion in the 200-meter backstroke. At Seattle’s Colman Pool, Jack broke the World Record in the 880-yard freestyle. Jack swam for the University of Indiana and was an NCAA All-American. He also competed in the 1970 World University Games. Jack began his competitive swimming with the Triton Swim Club at the Red Shield Youth Club in Seattle under the tutelage of his coach Earl Ellis. He continued his Pacific Northwest swimming at Tacoma Swim Club under Dick Hannula.




  • Athlete: Steve Krause
    Steve Krause, an extraordinarily talented young swimmer, was the first champion and record holder for Cascade Swim Club. His unique primary training pool was a 16 2/3-yard pool. Steve shocked the swimming world as a 15-year old when he simultaneously set a World Record and won the 1500-meter freestyle event in the 1965 US Long Course National Championships. Steve was a member of the 1965 US National Team that competed in Europe. Although Steve swam faster than his earlier World Record time in the 1962 US Long Course National Championships, he was runner-up to swimming legend Mike Burton. Steve was coached by John Tallman.



  • Athlete: Helene Madison
    Helene Madison is considered to be the world’s greatest female freestyle swimmer. She was virtually unbeatable at any distance in freestyle swimming and at one time held every freestyle American Record. She won every AAU National Championship freestyle event in 1930. She was named the 1931 Female Athlete of the Year by the Associated Press when she repeated that feat and set three World Records in less than two weeks. She won the Indoor National Championship freestyle events in 1932. Helene set an amazing twenty World Records at every distance in the freestyle events: the 100-yard, the 440-yard, the 880-yard, and the 1-mile. In the 1932 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, Helene became the first woman to win three gold medals in one Olympic Games. Her gold-medal events were the 100- and 400-meter freestyle and the 4 x 100-meter freestyle relay. She set World Records in the latter two events. Helene swam for the Washington Athletic Club and was coached by Ray Daughters. Helene was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1966 at the ISHOF’s second induction ceremony.



  • Athlete: Jack Medica
    Jack Medica is one of the Pacific Northwest’s most decorated swimmers. During his swimming tenure, he was the world’s fastest swimmer. He held twelve World Records from distances between 200 meters and 1-mile. Representing the University of Washington, Jack was the NCAA Champion in the 220-yard, 440-yard, and 1500-meter freestyle events three years in a row— from 1934 through 1936. He held the record of nine NCAA Championships for forty-one years—until it was broken in 1977. Jack won the gold medal in the 400-meter freestyle in the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin, Germany. Also in these Olympic Games, he won silver medals in the 1500-meter freestyle event and the 4 x 200-meter freestyle relay. Jack won the AAU National Outdoor Championships in the 440-yard and 880-yard freestyle in 1933 and 1934. He was the 1-Mile Champion in 1934. He won the 220-yard freestyle in the AAU National Indoor Championship in 1935 and 1936. Jack was coached by Ray Daughters at the Washington Athletic Club. He was coached by Jack Torney as a University of Washington swimmer. Jack coached swimming at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania. Jack was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1966 at the ISHOF’s second induction ceremony.


  • Athlete: Megan Quann
    Megan Quann won a gold medal and broke the American Record in the 100-meter breaststroke and won a gold medal in the 4 x 100-medley relay at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia. She was the US National Champion in the 100-meter breaststroke in 1998, 1999, 2002, and 2003. Megan was the 1998 Goodwill Games bronze medalist and the gold and silver medalist at the 1999 Pan Pacific Championships. Megan competed in the 2001 World Swimming Championships and the 2004 US Olympic Team Trials. Megan swam for the Puyallup Swim Club, coached by Rick Benner, and the South Sound Titans, coached by Dave Kienlen.


  • Athlete: Nancy Ramey


    Nancy Ramey, one of the Pacific Northwest’s international swimming talents, won the silver medal in the 100-meter butterfly in the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia. Nancy broke the 1958 World Record and the American Record in the 100-meter butterfly. Notably, she broke these records again in 1959. Nancy swam at the Washington Athletic Club under the tutelage of Ray Daughters.





  • Coach: Ray Daughters
    Ray Daughters had a stellar coaching career, bringing great notoriety and accolades to the Pacific Northwest and its early swimming stars. His unprecedented success began at the Washington Athletic Club where he had the privilege of coaching many talented swimmers, including two of the greatest swimmers in swimming history—Helene Madison and Jack Medica. Ray also coached 1956 Olympian Nancy Ramey. Pacific Northwest Swimming Hall of Fame 2004 Inductees Bob Miller and Bob Regan also swam at the Washington Athletic Club under Ray Daughters. Ray is credited with coaching WAC swimmers to 30 World Records, 301 American Records, and 64 National Championships. Ray coached the US Olympic Team in four consecutive Olympic Games: 1936, 1948, 1952, and 1956 (Berlin, London, Helsinki, and Melbourne). He was the US Olympic Team manager for the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome, Italy. Ray was the chairman of the AAU Men’s Swimming Committee and the U.S. Men’s Olympic Swimming Committee. Ray was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1971 as a coach honoree.


  • Coach: Earl Ellis


    Earl Ellis began his distinguished coaching career at Seattle’s Red Shield Youth Club with the Triton Swim Club in 1960. His most successful club swimmers were Olympians Jack Horsley and Barbara Mitchell. Earl coached at the University of Washington from 1969 through 1998. He coached seven Olympians on his club and college teams, including Lynn Colella and Rick Colella. During Earl’s outstanding coaching career at the University of Washington, he built its program into a national collegiate swimming power.









  • Coach: Dick Hannula
    Dick Hannula had a distinguished career during his four decades of swim coaching. He founded the Tacoma Swim Club in 1955 and served as its head coach until his retirement in 1997. He coached four US Olympians, including gold medalist and world-record holder Kaye Hall. Dick coached several US National Champions, two World Record holders, two Olympic Record holders, thirteen American Record holders, and two National High School Record holders. Dick coached US Teams at the World Swimming Championships, the Pan American Games, the World University Games, and five US National Swimming competitions. Also, he was a US Team manager in the Pan American Games and two Olympic Games. Dick’s outstanding swimming career at Wilson High School (Tacoma) is superbly noted by the 323 consecutive high school swimming meets without defeat and twenty-four consecutive Washington State Boys’ Swimming Championship titles won by his swimmers. In 1987 Dick was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame as a coach honoree.



  • Coach: Bob Miller

    Bob Miller’s highly successful Pacific Northwest swim coaching career has benefited swimmers for more than four decades. In1956 Bob co-founded the Olympic Swim School, along with two other swimming enthusiasts. The Cascade Swim Club evolved from this organization. Bob coached at Cascade Swim Club until 1971. He also coached for the Totem Lakes Swim Team (1971-1976) and the Bellevue Club (1984-2000). Many of Bob’s swimmers swam in the Olympic Games, the World Swimming Championships, the Pan American Games, and other major international meets. His most outstanding swimmers were Olympic medalists Lynn Colella and Rick Colella. Bob was the US National Team coach at several international competitions, including the Pan American Games. Because of his continued success and expertise in the swimming world, Bob was honored as the American Swim Coaches Association’s 1973 Coach of the Year. In his youth Bob was a member of the USA national team in the Modern Pentathlon at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia.




  • Coach: Jack Ridley

    Jack Ridley began his successful coaching career at the Lake Washington Swim Club. He coached there from 1971 through 1976. When Lake Washington Swim Club merged with Chinook Swim Club, Jack served as its head swimming coach until 1995. His most successful swimmers were World Record holder Jo Harshbarger, Olympic medalist Mary Wayte, and three-time US National Champion Uger Taner. Jack coached US swimmers at two World Swimming Championships and several other international competitions. A talented swimmer in his own right, Jack was an All-American at Central Washington University.







  • Coach: John Tallman

    John Tallman helped restore swimming to national and international prominence in the Pacific Northwest during the 1950s and 1960s. With his expertise in kinesiology, John was successful in using scientific principles in his coaching techniques. John was co-founder of both the Olympic Swim School and the Cascade Swim Club. John was head coach at Cascade Swim Club from 1959 to 1966. In 1962 he also became the swimming coach at the University of Washington. He continued in this position for six years. During his swimming career, John coached World Record holder Steve Krause, Olympic medalist Rick Colella, and World Record holder and Olympic medalist Lynn Colella. John served as coach for the US National Team on international tour. John was one of the founders and early presidents of the American Swimming Coaches’ Association (ASCA).






  • Coach: Jack Torney

    Jack Torney, Jr. is the Pacific Northwest’s father of intercollegiate and interscholastic swimming. Jack initiated the University of Washington competitive swimming program in 1932 and inaugurated the first boys’ high school state championship with an invitational meet in 1934. With the exception of the 1943-1944 war years, Jack continued his coaching career at the University of Washington through the 1962 season. Jack’s greatest collegiate competitive swimmer was Jack Medica, an Olympic gold medalist and International Swimming Hall of Fame member. Jack also coached Pacific Northwest Swimming Hall of Fame members Bob Miller, Bob Regan, and John Tallman at the University of Washington. Jack is the author of Aquatic Organization and Management and the co-author of Teaching Aquatics.





  • Contributor: Bob Regan

    Bob Regan has been the voice of Pacific Northwest swimming for over fifty years. His familiar voice is recognized by thousands of swimmers and aquatic enthusiasts who have competed or attended major swimming competitions in the Pacific Northwest—Washington State Boys’ and Girls’ High School State Meets, AAU and US National Championships, and University of Washington competitions. Bob was instrumental in revitalizing competitive club swimming in the region. He was co-founder of the Olympic Swim School, which later became the Cascade Swim Club. Besides coaching for Cascade Swim Club, Bob coached at Lake Washington Swim Club. As the aquatics manager for the King County Park Department, Bob was involved in the planning, design, and programming of the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center. Bob’s steady leadership, guidance, dedication and commitment have helped bring swimming to national prominence in the Pacific Northwest. Most notably Bob has given years of voluntary service to Pacific Northwest Swimming, including several terms as chairman.


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