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Reading the Pace Clock
 
 
TRAINING
INFO
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Reading the
Pace Clock
We use the pace clock during every practice, whether it's to help leave 5 seconds behind the previous swimmer, performing sets on an interval, or calculating our pace. Learning to read the pace clock is a skill every swimmer should develop, especially at a young age.
 
Leaving 5 Seconds Apart
  • Remember to keep an eye on the pace clock and push off 5 seconds behind the swimmer in front of you. This will allow enough space between swimmers for a smooth practice set.  Leaving too early disrupts the person in front of you; leaving too late disrupts everyone behind you.  Be respectful of everyone in your lane!
 Interval Training
  • All of our training groups use interval training, including our youngest swimmers in the White Group. Intervals help keep a nice steady flow to practice.  Most importantly, interval training is a great way for coaches and swimmers to keep track of an athlete's progress.
  • With our coaches help and the information below, our White and Blue Group swimmers should have a good grasp of the clock and interval training in no time.
 Basic Interval Examples
  • 8 x 50 freestyle on 1:00
    • This means the swimmer has one minute to swim a 50 freestyle and get their rest.  Once the minute is up, the swimmer needs to start the next 50, repeating this eight times.
    • If the swimmer performs a 50 in forty seconds, they will get twenty seconds of rest before leaving again.
  • 6 x 100 IM on 1:40
    • The swimmer has one minute and forty seconds to swim a 100 IM and get their rest.  When the 1:40 is up, the swimmer needs to start the next 100, repeating this six times.
 
Information Given by Team Unify
 
How to Read the Clock
  • The clocks that we use during practice are digital.  The examples below use analog clocks.  The main difference for our swimmers is the analog clock uses 60, whereas the digital clock goes to 00 after each minute.  However, the explanations below should still help our swimmers.
  • By thinking of the clock face as a pie, it becomes easier to visualize into segments and keep track of your swims and send-off times.  Listed on this page are some basic intervals along with an explanation of how to figure your next repeat.
 60 Second Intervals
  • Interval sets that are exactly one minute (or two minutes, three minutes, etc) are easy!  Whatever number you start the first swim on, will be the same number for all repeats in the entire set.  For example, if you leave on the "top" or the 60 second mark (00 on our digital clocks), on all the following repeats you will push off on the 60 again.  If you leave on the "bottom" or the 30 second mark, on all the following repeats you will push of on the 30 again.
 
 
30 Second Intervals
  • When using interval sets that are either 30 seconds (or end in 30 seconds: 1:30, 2:30, etc.) you will always leave on one of two numbers.  Those two numbers will be directly across from each other on the clock.  For example, if your interval is 1:30 and you leave on the 60, you will push off again on the 30.
 
 
20 or 40 Second Interval
  • Intervals of either 20 or 40 seconds slice the pace clock into thirds.  This means you will always leave on one of three numbers.
  • If your interval is 20 seconds (or 1:20, 2:20, etc.) your numbers will rotate clockwise.  For example, if your interval is 1:20 and you push off on the 60, your next push off would be at the 20, then the 40, and then the 60 again.
  • If your interval is 40 seconds (or 1:40, 2:40, etc.) your numbers will rotate counter-clockwise.  For example, if your interval is 1:40 and you push off on the 30, your next push of would be at the 10, then the 50, and then the 30 again.
 
 
15 or 45 Second Intervals
  • Intervals of either 15 or 45 seconds will split the clock into fourths.  This means that you will always leave on one of four numbers.
  • If your interval is 15 seconds (or 1:15, 2:15, etc.) your numbers will rotate clockwise.  For example, if your interval is 1:15 and you push off on the 30, your next push off would be at the 45, then the 60, then the 15, and finally the 30 again.
  • Intervals ending in 45 seconds (1:45, 2:45, etc.) will have send-off numbers that rotate counter-clockwise. For example, if your interval is 1:45 and you push off on the 60, your next push off would be at the 45, then the 30, then the 15, and finally the 60 again.
  • In both cases, you will notice that the send-off numbers will alternate ending in 5 or 0.
 
 
10 or 50 Second Intervals
  • Intervals of 10 seconds (1:10, 2:10, etc.) and 50 seconds (:50, 1:50, etc.) are easy!
  • For 10 second intervals, your next send-off always advances in a clockwise rotation.  For example, if your interval is 1:10 and you push off on the 60, your next push off would be at the 10, then 20, etc.
  • Send-offs for 50 second intervals always retract in a counter-clockwise rotation.  For example, if your interval is 1:50 and you push off on the 30, your next push off would be on the 20, then 10, etc.
 5 or 55 Second Intervals
  • Intervals of 5 seconds (1:05, 2:05, etc.) will always advance one number.  For example, if your interval is 1:05 and you push off on the 60, your next push off would be at the :05, then 10, etc.
  • Intervals of 55 seconds (1:55, 2:55, etc.) will always retract one number.  For example, if your interval is 1:55 and you push off on the 30, your next push off would be at the 25, then 20, etc.