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Building The Athlete

Building The Athlete

Athletic people will always end up on the top of a sport. Building the Athlete is a focus for Conejo Simi Swim Club. Encouraging 10 and under children to do multiple sports and allow swimming to be part of the athletic development. CSSC does include dryland to help build athleticism. Running, Jumping, resistance, Core, and range of motion are all aspects of developing an athlete. These are all exercises that make a swimmer a better athlete that will help lead to long-term success. Specialization leads to developing certain muscles and motions that will peak sooner if focused on too much early on. Doing different swim strokes, different distances, and different sports allows for the result of early specialization not to set in, and utilizing supportive muscle to increase force (propulsion) can lead to the higher level of success.

The 11 - 14 year old athlete will likely narrow their activities at this period of maturation. The focused athlete in their high school years would benefit from cross training, so swimming is always an option for those that pound away at their bodies on land. Swimmers on CSSC continue to cross train throughout their training year round with dryland exercises and the focus of that dryland changes throughout the year.

Building the Athlete Mindset becomes very important. High Level athletes make up a small percentage of our population. The mindset that their sport is important to put the time and effort into the sport over what culture deems necessary part of high school. Hanging out with friends on weekdays, going to high school sporting events, extracurricular activities, and even some events that were important to the family when the child was young; are still great things, but not at the expense of the training. Most people don't understand this mindset, but that is why not many are high level athletes. The highest 1% don't think like the majority of society or they wouldn't be there.