Background-image
Sponsors & Partners
Virginia+Swimming
PSDN
Maconit
Virginia+Automatic+Door+company
Construction+Rentals
OrthoVirginia
Speedo
GRAP
All Age Group News

Age Group Gold and Silver - Meeting Monday October 29th, 2012

WIN NOW

WIN NOW; these are two words that can completely change the way you build your business or pursue your life goals. The result of applying the WIN NOW principles are that you indeed will “win now”! But aside from being a nice sounding phrase, WIN NOW can teach an attitude that will empower you to achieve your goals, remind you of what you should be focusing on, and help you take advantage of every opportunity you are given. WIN NOW is the combination of two important acronyms. WIN stands for What’s Important Now? NOW stands for No Opportunity Wasted.

Throughout the day it is really easy to get off track and move away from important action to doing things that are only a waste of time. By asking yourself “What’s Important Now” you can remind yourself that there are things that are important and you can move back to activities that will help you accomplish what is important.

The answer to the WIN question will change throughout your day/practice. At times, WIN will mean giving complete attention to your streamline; at times WIN will mean taking steps towards hitting your goal pace, and at times it will mean being the best teammate you can be. The key is that you SHOULD be doing the important thing at any one moment.

In order to apply WIN you need to have an understanding of what exactly is important. Knowing what’s important comes from an understanding of your mission and your goals. Your personal mission should help you always have a clear understanding of what sort of things are going to be important to you.

After you have clarity around your mission you can set goals. For goals to be effective within the WIN principle you need to have long-term goals that are broken down into short-term goals set on a weekly basis. Each week you should set your priorities in each of the different areas of practice or in your life. If you understand clearly your weekly goals that will allow you to focus on WIN throughout each day. The things that will be important are those things that help you achieve your weekly goals.

The second part of the phrase is NOW, or No Opportunity Wasted.NOW refers to never letting a chance for growth go past you. Opportunities are all around us. There are opportunities in all realms of practice and life – your physical effort, your personal life and or your mental attitude. NOW means that you will be watching for these opportunities, you will recognize them when they present themselves and take advantage of them.

NOW will connect directly with WIN. The opportunities you will look for when applying NOW will be the things that help you achieve the important things from WIN. “No Opportunity Wasted” will help you to look for any opportunity to do the important things that will help you achieve your goals.

By combining NOW and WIN you get the phrase WIN NOW; which is exactly what will happen for you if you continually apply these principles.With WIN you will be always asking yourself “What’s Important Now?” This understanding will allow you to take action towards these goals. NOW will help you to remember to be watching for opportunities throughout your day, and then spur you to take action towards those activities, even if it means moving through your comfort zone and doing things that may cause fear. These actions towards the important things in life will indeed help you WIN NOW.

Is it any different for the rest of us? When we focus on What's Important Now, we become the best we can be during our own most challenging moments. We are deciding that this activity is the most important thing we could be doing in our lives in this moment. We are not experiencing an urge to be somewhere else, to do something else, or to think about something else.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Age Group Gold and Silver- Meeting Monday October 15th, 2012

Announcements: Great job on the weekend, I was very pleased with the performance from the groups, its now time to do things better and faster as we progress into the season.

Sign up for the Intra-Squad meet and pick your events, Ashland Berry Farm Friday night at 8pm.

Here is the topic we discussed in our meeting, I think this is great for this part of the season right after our first meet.

Self talk is the world’s most mysterious language. We all do it constantly — you know, that whisper that comes into your head at key moments, the one that says, okay, take a deep breath… keep your weight on the balls of your feet… now go!  — but it happens mostly unconsciously, and nobody talks about it.

Which is strange, because when it comes to skills, self talk is a massively useful tool. For example, studies show that skilled athletes tend to self-talk more often, and in a more planned and consistent manner (less-skilled athletes tend merely to react). Sprinters who self-talk run faster. Good self talk functions like an early-warning radar system, helping us to identify key moves and navigate problems. Done well, it’s like having a coach inside your head.

But here’s the question: if self talk is a good thing, how do we get better at it? Is it possible to teach it, the same way you’d learn any language?  With that in mind, here are a few tips — some from experiments, some from my observations.

1) Keep it short and chunky. Good self talk is never chatty or complicated. It divides the skill into its key moves, and uses those as clear cues. For example, with a golf swing:

  • Say this: “Smooth arms, still head.”
  • Not this: “Okay, let’s keep the takeaway smooth, relax your posture, make sure to keep your head still through the backswing.”

2) Make it vivid. The more vivid the image, the easier it is to remember, and to do. For example, with a violin player working on posture:

  • Say this: “Stand like a tree.”
  • Not this: “Make sure you stand up straight.”

3) Keep it positive. Don’t focus on what you want to avoid, but on what you want to accomplish. For example, for a soccer player practicing penalty kicks:

  • Say this: “Keep tempo; hit it clean.”
  • Not this: “Don’t rush the shot, don’t get under the ball.”

Finally, and maybe most usefully, fluent self-talkers don’t just talk to themselves during their performance; they also do it before and after. Self talk is like a game tape: you use it to preview what’s going to happen, and then afterwards you use it again to walk through what happened, and figure out how you might do it better the next time.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Age Group Gold and Silver- Meeting Monday October 8th, 2012

Announcement: No practice Friday or Saturday this weekend due to our home swim meet. PSDN will be having a Blue/White Dual in the pool Saturday October 27th, followed by a picnic and a membership meeting.

9 Things Successful People Do Differently

Monday’s topic is one in which I hope the kids will be able to apply throughout the year when it comes to reaching their goals. While reading this article, there was not one mention of swimming but the overall theme was that of reaching your goals. If someone has a goal to lose weight, get all A’s, or break 1:00 in an event these 9 guidelines will help.

1.       Get Specific- When you set a goal, be specific as possible. “Lose 5 pounds” or “swim a 57.99”. Also, know the specific actions that will need to be taken to reach your goal.

2.       Seize the moment to act on your goals- To seize the moment, decide when and where you will take each action you want to take, in advance.  Again, be specific as possible. Studies show that this kind of planning will help your brain detect and seize the opportunity when it arises, increasing your chances of success by roughly 300%.

3.       Know exactly how far you have left to go- Achieving any goal also requires honest and regular monitoring of your progress- if not by others then by yourself. If you don’t know how well you are doing, you can’t adjust your behavior or your strategies accordingly. Check your progress frequently.

4.       Be a realistic optimist- When you are setting a goal, by all means engage in lots of positive thinking about how likely you are to achieve it. But whatever you do, don’t underestimate how difficult it will be to reach your goal.  Most goals worth achieving require time, planning, effort, and persistence.

5.       Focus on getting better, rather than being good – Believing you have the ability to reach your goals is important, but so is believing you can get the ability.  Many of us believe that our intelligence, our personality, and our physical aptitudes are fixed.  As a result, we focus on goals that are all about proving ourselves rather than developing and acquiring new skills. 

6.       Have GRIT – Grit is a willingness to commit to long term goals and to persist in the face of difficulty.  The good news is if you aren’t particularly gritty now, there is something they can do about it. 

7.       Build your willpower muscle – Your self-control “muscle” is just like the other muscles in your body – when it doesn’t get much exercise it becomes weaker over time.  To build willpower, take on a challenge that requires you to do something you would honestly rather not do.  As your willpower grows, you can take on more challenges and step up your self control workout.

8.       Don’t tempt fate – No matter how strong your willpower muscle becomes, it is important to always respect the fact that it is limited, and if you overtax it you will temporarily run out of steam.  Many people are overly confident in their ability to resist temptation, and as a result they put themselves in situations where temptations abound.  Successful people know not to make reaching a goal harder than it already is.

9.       Focus on what you will do, not what you won’t do – Plan how you will replace bad habits with good ones, rather than focusing only on the bad habits themselves.  Research on thought suppression (e.g., “Don’t think about white bears!”) has shown that trying to avoid a thought makes it even more active in your mind.  The same holds true when it comes to behavior – by trying not to engage in a bad habit, our habits get strengthened rather than broken. 

Applying these 9 principles in their daily life will help anyone reach their goals.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Age Group Gold and Silver, October 1 Meeting.

Today I reviewed an article out of the 2011 September/October issue of Splash Magazine, titled Getting The Most Out of Your Season. Below is the article. I have underlined what I stressed as I was reading the article to the swimmers.  I have alos asked the swimmers to create another reminder of their goals to go on their bags. I suggest making an index card and one side they have their goals times and on the other side the three sentence positive monologue that is on their goal sheet.

Get The Most Out of Your Season: Splash Magazine September /October 2011

Would you like to have a breakthrough season? Want to know the biggest secret that will help you take your swimming to the next level? How would you like to finally nail down some of those elusive cuts that have been eluding you these last number of months? Well it all begins right now, at the very start of your season, long before you step up on the blocks and get ready for that first big race of your championship meet. The secret to having a successful season depends upon you having a specific direction for your training, each and every day, and then staying focused on it.

Let me explain.

I hope you know by now that there’s absolutely no way you can swim to your potential in any race if your concentration is off. Focusing on the wrong things before and during your race is probably the major cause of performance problems in the pool. When it comes to race time, being able to focus on what’s important and let go of everything else is the key to going fast when it counts the most. This very same principle operates over the course of your season. You can’t get the most out of your daily and weekly training and be successful at championships unless you are properly focused every day in practice on what you ultimately want to accomplish this season. Having the “proper focus” in practice means that as you train physically, your mind is right there with you, keeping up with what you are doing in that moment.

The very best way to accomplish this in practice is by periodically asking yourself this important question: “How is what I’m doing right now, going to help me get to where I want to go?” When you ask yourself this question, especially during a particularly tough practice, it helps keep you motivated and pointed in the right direction. Furthermore, it makes what you’re doing right now – in this set – much more meaningful. Being able to link what you’re doing right now with your end-of-season goals will keep you focused so that your training consistently stays at a high level. It will help you maintain proper stroke mechanics and good clean turns, even when you’re tired and your body is screaming for mercy! Whenever you connect what you are doing right now with what you want to accomplish at the end of this season, you’ll be much less likely to cut corners.

Far too many swimmers regularly lose touch with WHY they are in the pool practicing. As a consequence, they succumb to the “lights are on but no-one is home” syndrome. That is, while their bodies are going through today’s practice, their minds are nowhere to be found. Unfortunately when you train like this, you will get much less out of what you are doing. Don’t let yourself be a “space cadet” when you practice. Always keep the end in mind whenever you train. Have a specific direction that you want to head in this season and then continually check in with yourself on a daily basis to make sure what you’re doing right now, both physically and mentally, is going to help get you exactly where you want to go. To train like a champion you must concentrate like one. You must discipline yourself every day in practice to stay focused on what’s important, on the quest that you’re on this season, and let everything else go.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Age Group Gold and Silver, September 24th Meeting.

Below is a link to our handout that covers a summary of our season plan.

Season Outline Short Course 2012-13

Age group gold and silver will also have an activity at the Johnson's house Saturday night Sept 29th.

We are off to a great start to the season.  Like I said in the parent meeting, we are going to plan some outside team building activities.  Meredith Johnson (Garrison's mom) has graciously offered their house for an outdoor movie night for Age Group Silver and Age Group Gold.  We will do this Sat September 29th from 7pm-9pm (while the weather is still nice).  The movie will be determined.  Please plan to attend if you can, bring a drink for yourself and a blanket or a lawn chair! Popcorn will be provided.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

AGE GROUP BRONZE NEWS:

I have been very impressed by the swimmers in AG Bronze. We have worked kicking, technique drills and concepts, and some general conditioning thus far. Next week we will focus on turns and other important details before really stepping up the training the following week. We will start using equipment (fins, kickboard, snorkel) regularly on October 1st. Please do your best to get all of your equipment before then.

We will have an AG Bronze Parents' Meeting on Monday, September 24th at 7:15pm. Please do your best to attend. We will discuss practice goals and expectations, the swim meet schedule and other important information so that parents have a good understanding of what we are working to accomplish. 

Thanks in advance for your support and encouragement.

Mark

Fall 2012-13 Age Group Gold and Silver Parent Meeting

Welcome back and welcome to all the new members! Thanks for coming. We are off to a great start and have been slowly building throughout preseason and now the first 2 weeks. The atmosphere has been outstanding!

·         The goal for Age Group Silver and Gold is to provide a learning and training atmosphere for our 13 and over’s so that they may be competitive on the local, regional, state, and national level. Also to prepare them for senior level swimming, whether it is I, II, or III.

·         What has the first month (2 weeks preseason/ 2 weeks regular schedule) been like?

o   Lots of teaching and learning our basic drills we will use throughout the year.

o   Video equipment. IKKOS and underwater camera.

o   Building our endurance and work load every day.

o   Dry land started slow the first week but picking up now.

·         Communication- Working with the coach in support of your athlete.

o   Email is the best way to communicate- meetings can be made if email and or phone conversation doesn’t resolve question.

o   My home office hours are Mon-Fri 12:00pm to 2:00pm

o   Absences- 1day vs. 1 week

o   Poseidon website Age Group page.

·         How the coach “coaches”

o   Individual attention to the swimmers while in a group environment.

o   Emphasis on technique through endurance.

o   Capacity of the swimmer. Building a base. Freestyle and IM training

o   Utilization of stroke. Event specific.

o   Education to the swimmers on self accountability through weekly Monday meetings.

·         Competition Focus

o   Goal Sheets are out/online. Due September 24th.

o   Local meets October, November, and January

o   December championship- Tom Dolan or Turkey Clause (both T/F and at U of M)

o   February begin our championship meets- Districts and Regional’s (QT)

o   March- Sr. Champs (QT) and Age Group Champs (QT)

o   April – NASA Showcase Classic (QT)

·         What else?

o   Equipment- fins, snorkel, kick board.

o   Team Attire- T-shirts, team Speedo suit. Championship suits???

o   Meet sign up- When? How?

o   Activities? Doughnut Saturday will have signup sheet. Ideas would like a parent to lead this? i.e. bowling, laser tag, Halloween stuff, movie night, breakfast after Saturday practice.

·         Questions???

__________________________________________________________________________________

Monday, September 17th -

Today we had our annual goal meeting.  Attached you will find my goal sheet that I gave out to all the kids. 

Poseidon Swimming SC Goal Sheet 2012-13

___________________________________________________________________________________

September 16th - Upcoming weekly reminders

We are planning on having our SC goal meeting tomorrow - We are going to discuss not only Individual goals but what we would like to accomplish a a team.  Please plan to attend if you can, if not I will have extra copies of goal sheets with me and on-line

Our first meet of the year will be Oct. 12-14th, held at our pool - please plan to attend if you can - sign ups are available online - just commit and I will enter individual events. 

If you have not ordered your equipment, this can be done through the office, please do this ASAP.  Age Group Silver and Gold will need fins, snorkel and kick board.

Just as a heads up I (Mike) will not be at practice Friday night and Saturday morning as I will be traveling with the Senior team. Please continue to check the website for any updates about practice changes that may come up this weekend.

Thanks, Mike

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Below is the hand out I gave to Age Group Gold/Silver/SR1 on the first day of practice (if you missed the first day I will have a copy for you).   It overviews my expectations for some basic skills we will be covering - by no means do I expect everyone to do these perfect from Day 1, but now they know what they can work on and what I will be correcting them on as we start the season.

DO YOUR JOB

As you mature as a swimmer you will be asked to have more expectations. What are those expectations?   What am I to be held accountable for?  Below is a starter list of some of those expectations.   Also, you can expect to be corrected and/or coached if these expectations are not met. That is our job as your coaches.   Do your job and we will flourish as a team!

“The difference between something good and something great is attention to detail.” ~Charles Swindoll

Miscellaneous

*Listen to the coaches, with your EYES and ears.

*Respect everyone as an individual

*Give 100% effort in everything you do. (swimming and school)

*Communicate with the coaches effectively- (missing practice, stroke correction, times, stoke count, HR)

*Start all sets and every repeat within a set from a proper Drop-In

*Leave on time for every set and repeat (i.e. 5 sec or 10 sec apart)
*Always finish to the wall with speed
*Know your times in practice on all repeats

*Know your best times from meets in practices.

Freestyle:

*Streamline correctly off every wall (eyes down); Kick fast off walls
*Do NOT breathe on the 1st stroke off the wall
*Breathe every 3 strokes unless a coach offers different instructions
*Work 3 dolphin kicks off turns at every wall; Work a bottom arm breakout off every wall
*Do NOT breathe inside the flags at the finish
*Limit breathing on short sprint efforts

Breaststroke:

*Streamline correctly off every wall (eyes down)
*Work a powerful underwater pullout off every wall; Keep eyes down throughout entire pullout
*Always touch the wall with 2 hands on turns and finishes

Backstroke:

*Always drop-in and finish on your back
*Streamline correctly off every wall (chin up); Work fast “sub kicks” off every wall
*Be aware of your breathing when you swim; Do NOT breathe on the 1st stroke off walls

Butterfly:

*Streamline correctly off every wall (eyes down); Work fast “sub kicks” off every wall
*Do NOT breathe on the 1st stroke off walls
*Breathe every other stroke unless a coach offers different instructions
*Always touch the wall with 2 hands on turns and finishes

I have read, reviewed, and understand the above job description with Mike; and will do my very best to follow each one on my path to being the very best swimmer I can be for myself and Poseidon Swimming Inc.

Mike

 

September 9th, 2012

Tomorrow kicks off the first full season for Poseidon Swimming in their new home. All the groups will have many new faces to welcome them into the family and I hope Age Group is helping lead the charge in making everyone feel right at home. I am sure everyone is eager to start, as am I, so be sure to check our schedule for practice times and dryland times.

With that said, be sure to have dryland clothes and tennis shoes for what ever activity we have planned. Many have asked about equipment for practice, please have at every practice; fins, snorkel, and kick board (all can be ordered through the office). Also have extra suits, caps, and goggles. Don't forget a water bottle.

If it is possible I would like everyone to plan on being at your practice 15 minutes early to continue the shoulder exercises we have learned along with some other new pre practice exercises to get us ready to train.

Hope everyone is as fired up as the coaching staff to start our new journey together. GO PSDN!

Mike

NO Practice Monday September 3rd for all Age Groups. Enjoy your last day of summer!!!

 

WE WILL OFFER AGE GROUP PRACTICE BEGINNING AUGUST 27, 6:30 - 8:00 PM.

August 27, 2012

AG Bronze- I am looking forward to seeing everyone this week as we begin pre-season practices TODAY. Swimmers should wear or bring tennis shoes every day for dryland training outdoors. Also, be sure to have a water bottle at every practice.

Reminder- if your swimmer is planning to participate this season and you have not already done so, please be sure to register him/her as soon as possible.

If you have questions, please feel free to contact me. 757-675-4364. Thanks in advance for your support and encouragement.

Mark V.

 

Congratulations to everyone on a successful LC season. I hope everyone is enjoying their break and is looking forward to the 2012-13 short course season.

Age group will be starting an optional practice on Monday August 27th. This practice will consist of dryland and swimming so be ready to do both for every practice. There will be only one practice offered and that time is TBA soon.

Again enjoy the break we all deserve it!!!

 

 

2012 LC Test Set Results

30 Min FR swim for distance with 30 sec rest at 300- Results Test 1 5-1-12

30 Min IM swim for distance with 20 sec rest at 200- Results Test 1 5-8-12

20 Min FLY swim for distance with 10 sec rest at 50- Results Test 1 5-15-12

20 Min Br swim for distance with 10 sec rest at the 100- Results Test 1 5-29-12

 

Age Group FYI #27 LC 2012, Monday July 2nd

Don't forget Championship meets are coming up and there is NO practice the night of July 4th. We will have morning practice.

Today we discussed a common theme during the Olympic Trials. One thing I kept hearing over and over again on TV was how the great ones "hate to lose". So I found this article which fits perfect. Enjoy

Improving Your Competitive Edge| By Steve George

What does it mean to compete? When someone is identified as "very competitive" or a "real competitor," what characteristics separate and identify that individual? Are there methods athletes can employ to improve or increase their competitive nature?
Coaches often talk about needing their players and teams to be more competitive, but are there sure fire, can't miss methods for developing more competitive players and teams. Simply put, if there was such a method, all coaches would be using it to help guide their teams to stronger performances.
A prominent component of competitiveness is mental and emotional toughness, which is defined by "the ability to consistently perform toward the upper range of your talent and skill regardless of competitive circumstances." Put another way, "mentally tough athletes think and talk tough, feel confident and energized, and perceive situations as being challenging rather than threatening." Does this sound like you, or are you someone who is more focused on the "Fear Factor": afraid of making errors, which leads to more and more errors?

So, what can an individual athlete or coach do to stimulate competitiveness, thereby enhancing the individual and teams ability to consistently perform at a higher level? The first element is coming to a determination if being competitive is really that important to the individual and/or team.

You often hear about how much someone wants to win, but who does not want to win in sports or in life? Essentially, everyone would like to be successful, so that is not really a good barometer for measuring competitiveness. After all, if success was easy to achieve, wouldn't everyone be successful?

Many top professional athletes have indicated that it is not winning but "hating to lose" that fuels their competitive drive; that their ambition to be successful is based on not wanting to fail more than on enjoying the fruits of success.

Let's go back to one of questions posed at the beginning of the article:

"When someone is identified as "very competitive" or a "real competitor," what characteristics separate and identify that individual for distinction?"

When you read that question, what image or player do you recall? I'll bet it is someone with a fiery court personality, someone who is very vocal on the court, someone who fights for every point. So, are there methods or drills for improving competitiveness? Yes, but only if someone wants to actually be competitive and is willing to make definitive changes in their personality and court demeanor, which can be easier said than done.

A coach can create a competitive atmosphere during practice by incorporating drills that require a player to compete for court time, such as a defensive drill in which you stay on the court only if you continue to make positive plays, or an attack drill where you must beat the block and hit certain shots to keep your spot. However, this methodology can only be successful when athletes "hate to lose" their spot, as opposed to being "satisfied" by giving their best effort.

A coach can create a competitive environment by demanding performance or by stipulating a punishment if success is not achieved-run on missed serves, rotate out on an error, not allow a player to hit if she does not pass accurately-but again, a player's competitive nature will not be improved if the player merely accepts the punishment as opposed to "hating to lose" court time, etc.

So how can an athlete improve her competitive ability? One word: Attitude! As player has to determine for herself how important it is to succeed? How important is it for her to achieve to her highest ability level? And, what she is willing to change about her personality to make this happen?

Change-whether skill development or mental/emotional toughness-only occurs through a concerted effort by a player to make corrections by refocusing her energy and concentration on new "programming." If fear and anxiety over making errors or not being able to make corrections dominates a player's psyche, than learning cannot take place. Simply stated, a player focuses on success, failure, or nothing. Two out of three of those options results in a player getting nowhere in terms of improving her game.

If you want to learn how to be more competitive, the first key is to understand that it begins in your mind with an attitude of success. Mistakes and errors are part of every sport and certainly a part of everyday life. Learning to cope and refocus your mental/emotional efforts is paramount to becoming a confident athlete who will enjoy competition for exactly what it is-competition-no more, no less. And the best place to start is where you have the best opportunity to develop a stronger mindset and feeling of success through repetition-practice!

Practice is study time, where you develop and enhance your ability to focus, play with determination, learn how to perform consistently, and dedicate yourself to becoming the best player you can be. Games/matches are the test; a time to display the personality and athletic skills you are developing.

After all, the real competition is you! Ultimately, being competitive means working to be the best player you can be and not being satisfied until you have reached the zenith of your abilities.

Age Group FYI #26 LC 2012, Monday, June 18th

                First off, hats off to another successful meet at our home pool.  Big congrats to Madison Boswell for making her OT cut in the 200 fly Sunday night, one of our “home grown” swimmers.  Madison is a shining example of where hard work and commitment will get you in our PSDN program.  I will get to the message of the day – but first let me talk about a few housekeeping reminders.  First off, hopefully most of you know by now that we have started our new summer schedule.  Please check the website for details.  Keeping the schedule in mind, our championship meets are coming up.  Please sign up ASAP.  The season is almost over even though it feels like it the summer has just begun. 

                Because the kids are out of school and there are many activities going on, whether it is camps or other outdoor activities, please keep in mind to make sure your swimmers are getting plenty of rest during the day between practices and at night as well, as championship meets are coming up.  I know I am preaching to the choir – but please remind them to wear sunscreen as this will help aid in protecting their skin as well as keeping their energy up for practices. 

                I wanted to go ahead and circle back to the topic which I am trying to get the kids to understand, both at the swim meet this past weekend and for our upcoming championship meets.  I always feel like the kids get to swim meets and want to compete and/or win more than they do at practice.  To me, this is backwards; kids should show up every day at practice to compete, learning to win to build their competitive fire.  This quote is from Steven from the meet this weekend “Competition breeds success”.  This could not be any truer for a group of athletes trying to obtain similar goals.  The more competing that will go on in practice, the more ready PSDN will be for our championship meets.  Understanding that you will take your lumps along the way, but the experience of the competition will have you prepared for future success.  Please remind the kids that competing at practice is essential so they can achieve their own individual goals and not to hold back.  Don’t hold back, don’t worry about other people’s feelings, it is practice – you will perform how you practice, so start practicing for success.         

Age Group FYI #25 LC 2012, June 11th, 2012

                A few housekeeping items first – Please remember the meet this weekend – if you have not signed up for a few volunteer time slots, please do so, our meets only run smoothly because our parents help to make this happen.  Because of the meet, there will be no practice Friday and Saturday.  Please make sure you sign up for the upcoming meets asap.  Also, make sure you are going ahead and purchasing championship suits and caps in time for the meets, if you have a question about the type of suit your swimmer should wear, please let me know.  As a reminder, next week’s practice schedule changes to our summer schedule – you can find this posted on our website.   As we are preparing for championship season, our topic for this week’s Monday meeting was “building a bulletproof brain and swimming like a superman”- It is an article from Swimming World magazine that I liked.  I will paste it below.  I think it will help the kids with their mental preparation going into champs. 

Can you imagine yourself standing at the end of the pool at your next Swim Meet, hands on your hips, with a huge smile on your face and laughing as all the usual challenges and problems like nervousness, anxiety, pressure, “psyche-outs”, emotions and noise bounce off you like bullets bouncing off Superman’s chest?

Would you like to be mentally stronger – mentally tougher, so that nothing can affect you, nothing can harm you, and nothing can stop you from swimming like superman?

Would you like to be so mentally tough that you go to Swim Meets filled with with courage, calm, confidence and composure (as opposed to feeling weak, wimpy and wishing you could be somewhere else?).

Here’s how:

  • Mental Toughness Tip 1: You have to make training more challenging and more demanding than the competition you are preparing for:
  • Mental Toughness Tip 2: You have to out-prepare – in every aspect – every swimmer that you will be facing in competition:
  • Mental Toughness Tip 3:You have to do the first two tips every day, in everything you do, in and out of the water.

Mental Toughness Tip 1: You have to make training (physically and mentally) more challenging and more demanding than the competition you are preparing for:

Think of it this way.

Imagine Swim Meets had a “ranking” between 1 and 10, where a ranking of 1 is a swim for fun meet at your own club just for prizes and laughs and a ranking of 10 is the Olympic final.
If you are preparing for local school Meet, let’s say with a ranking of 4 out of 10, then your preparation needs to be set at a level of 5 or 6 out of 10.

If you are preparing for the State Champs, with a ranking of 6 out of 10, make sure your preparation is at a level of 7 or 8 out of 10.

Unfortunately many swimmers prepare for a “4” level Meet by training at a level of 2 or 3 and then hope that everything will work out when they get to the competition pool. ….and hope is not a recommended strategy for success

By always preparing to a level higher than the Meet you are preparing for, you can race with the confidence that there is nothing the Meet can throw at you that you can’t beat: no obstacles you will have to face which can stop you, no challenge that will be too great for you to defeat.

Mental Toughness Tip 2: You have to out-prepare – in every aspect – every swimmer that you will be facing in competition:

This means not just training harder, smarter, more consistently and faster in the pool than your opposition – this means every aspect of your preparation must be better than every swimmer you will race against.

  • You have to eat better than your competition.
  • You have to get more (and better quality) sleep than your competition.
  • You have to work harder in the gym than your competition.
  • You have to take care of any injuries more effectively than your competition.
  • You have to manage your time, your work, your study and rest better than your competition.

Imagine for a moment you are preparing to race an outstanding swimmer at your next Meet. Imagine you are going to look across the pool to Lane 4 and there’s Phelps standing smiling back at you. Or Stephanie Rice.

Now there is nothing you can do to control their talent, their skill, their training or their abilities. All the things that they own – that are part of who they are – are outside your control. So forget about them.

What you can control is every aspect of your own preparation.

Youcan control what you eat.

You can control when you go to bed and how well you sleep.

Youcan control how much effort – how much focus – how much concentration you give to your pool and gym workouts.

And if you know that you have consistently “out-eaten”, “out-slept”, “out-recovered”, “out-gym-worked” and “out-trained” your competition you can go to the Meet with the confidence you can perform at your best in every situation, every race, every time.

Think of it another way.

If you were racing Phelps or Rice  - with all their talent and ability and….they had also eaten better than you, slept better than you, recovered better than you and trained better than you…you have no hope what-so-ever of beating them.

By Controlling the Controllables: by controlling all the things that you can control, you can always compete to your full potential and you are giving yourself the best possible opportunity for success.

Mental Toughness Tip 3: You have to do the first two tips every day, in everything you do, in and out of the water.

Want to know the secret to being mentally tough????

The secret to being mentally tough is to not have to be mentally tough!

Most people think being mentally tough is fighting hard to overcome tough situations. Others believe being mentally tough is staying strong in the face of adversity. Some people think being mentally tough is never showing pain and never succumbing to pressure.

But the real secret to being mentally tough is to not have to be mentally tough.

By ensuring that your training is consistently more challenging and more demanding than any Meet could ever be, and by knowing with absolute certainty that you have out-prepared in every aspect every competitor you will be facing in competition you don’t need to be mentally tough.

Talking tough, walking tough, yelling team war-cries, painting your face, listening to motivational speakers, getting tattoos, screaming out heavy-metal rock tunes…all these things are great fun but none of them are real and none make you really mentally tough.

Realmental toughness comes from one thing: preparation.

Real mental toughness comes from one person: you.

Realmental toughness is based on confidence.

Confidence which comes fromknowing.

Knowing that you have done all within your power to prepare to the best of yourability every day.

Age Group FYI #24 LC 2012 Monday June 4th, 2012

“Make your setback be your comeback”

                A few housekeeping topics:  as some of you may have noticed the pool was in SC today – periodically we will be using SC lanes/practices as other organizations come in and use lanes as well.  I think this a great opportunity to mix up there training as it will help them with their turns and give them some recovery from long course swimming.  For this week’s Monday meeting, we discussed the topic of “make your setback be your comeback”.  We used the example of world class swimmer Hayley McGregory from 2008.  I am not sure if anyone is aware of the Hayley’s story, but I will copy the SI story below.

HOW'S HAYLEY MCGREGORY doing these days? Well, how would you be doing if, after thousands upon thousands of hours of preparation, your dream was crushed in a fifth of a second? Bitterness, despondency and a long weekend with Jim Beam come to my mind, and that's just for starters.

And this was supposed to be her year. A gregarious 22-year-old with a cascade of brown curls, McGregory is one of the best backstrokers in the world. Indeed, at one point, the best. During the U.S. Olympic Trials last month McGregory set the world record in the 100 meters at 59.15. Time to pack for Beijing, right? Not quite. You see, McGregory made the mistake of swimming her best race during the preliminary round, and in the next heat Natalie Coughlin turned in a 59.03. For McGregory, it was sort of like being elected president only to have Congress pass a 15-minute term limit during her inauguration. To make the team she still had to advance through the semis, then finish in the top two in the finals.

For a moment, it seemed she had. With Coughlin in front, McGregory and Margaret Hoelzer appeared to hit the wall simultaneously. Only they didn't, of course, because nothing is ever simultaneous in swimming. So the women craned their necks toward the scoreboard. By .2 of a second—less time than it takes to gulp—Hoelzer had prevailed. McGregory covered her mouth in horror, as if witnessing a gruesome accident. Despite owning the second-fastest time ever, she wouldn't be racing in Beijing.

At least she had one more chance: the 200-meter backstroke. In the final she tore through the pool and held the lead going into the final turn, then touched the wall only to look up and see she'd come in ... third, this time by .77.

Forgive McGregory for feeling cursed. At the U.S. Olympic Trials in 2004 she also came in third. Twice. She missed Athens by .7 of a second in the 100-meter backstroke and .54 in the 200. (Cruel Irony Department: Her "losing" time in this year's 100-meter finals would have won gold at the '04 Games.) Think about that the next time you want to karate-kick a trash can because you missed the 8:05 to the office. You may have to wait 30 minutes. McGregory had to wait four years. Only to have it happen again.

Her friends, however well-intentioned, couldn't comfort her. "They have no idea what you're feeling," McGregory says. "They think they're helping, but they're not." So she lay on her L-shaped couch in her tiny Austin apartment for four days, watching reruns on the Food Network and mulling the future. She thought about finishing school at Texas, about a career in theater, about the physical toll of swimming—in Speedo years, 22 is ancient. She mused on the opportunity she passed up to swim for the country of her birth, England, where the competition is less rigorous. ("I thought it was a cop-out," she says. "The easy way to the Games.") Ultimately, McGregory realized what she had to do. She called her coach, Randy Reese, and broke the news: She wouldn't be showing up for practice.

Not that day at least. McGregory wanted one more afternoon on the couch. After all, she'd need her strength. She had a new goal: "Make the 2012 Games, my body willing."

Wait a second. What happened to wallowing in self-pity? "I could easily think of it as unfair," McGregory says. "But once I realized I wasn't a failure in anyone else's eyes I realized I needed to snap out of it and grow up." Her philosophy is one any kid playing sports could learn from. Hell, any adult. "Maybe I'm learning some valuable lessons here and will get to pass them on to someone else," says McGregory. "Maybe it's a lesson I'm not aware of yet."

So she's in the pool again, churning forward. Sure, she'll watch the Olympics, "if I happen to be in front of the TV," but she has other priorities. The U.S. Open Swimming Championships begin on July 29 in Minneapolis. Hoelzer and Coughlin won't be there, and Bob Costas won't be breathing gravitas into the event, but it's still a big meet. No doubt you've got plenty on your agenda that weekend, but take a moment if you can to think of McGregory, the swimmer who could have been broken but isn't.

I used this article because in this month’s Splash magazine, there is an article about what Hayley McGregory is doing now and what she learned from this - another good read.  I think this story is both inspiring in the pool and outside the pool – we will have setbacks in any arena in life – and it is what you take away from it and how you respond to it that makes the biggest difference.

 

Age Group FYI #23 LC 2012, Monday May 21st, 2012

Parents, only major announcement is that we will follow a Saturday schedule for Monday May 28th, Memorial Day.

Monday’s topic was taken out of my Lombardi Rules book. We talked about Being Completely Committed when at practice. I made sure to mention to the kids that I understand that they are not paid professionals and that there are other activities going on in their lives, so take this advice lightly but try to take this to the pool when you are there.

Total commitment implies a lack of concern for anything except the task at hand. Total commitment means no loafing, idling, standing around, goofing off, or phoning in sick. It means accepting sacrifice, suffering and hard work- in other words, whatever it takes to reach your goals.

The essence of commitment is the act of making a decision. The Latin root for decision is “to cut away from,” as in incision. When you commit to something, you are cutting away all you other possibilities, all your other options. When you commit to something, you are also cutting away all the rationalizations, all the excuses.

Here are three tips to help:

Start with yourself: Inspire those around you with your own level of commitment. When leaders go the extra mile, their troops will follow.

Talent only gets you so far: A person with 100% ability and 50% commitment can throw a wrench into the whole system through inattention, inconsistency, and laziness.

Inspire the uncommitted: The organization that wins is populated by winners. Get the last 10% out of everyone else.

In short I want everyone to understand that when they are at practice there is nothing else they should be focused on. All other distractions should be left at the door when they come to practice. If they can do this they will be able to get more out of each practice.

 

Age Group FYI #22 LC 2012, Monday May 14th, 2012

Monday’s meeting topic was about raising the bar, a topic we talked about last year at this time. Below is the article I read to the kids, written by Tim Conor. Before I read this short article to them we discussed how the bar is being raised constantly in their lives. During the meeting I stressed the fact that in order to raise the bar in athletics one must be able to recall best times in practice, know paces, stroke counts, and or faster intervals. Information is power when you are trying to achieve a new level.

From time to time everyone hits either a real winning streak or a real slump in their life. Life is about ups and downs. It is not a consistent upward rise to the top of the mountain nor is it a steady decline to the pits. It is give and take, winning and losing and acceptance of life either way. Now don't get me wrong I am not implying that you should accept losing as a way of life and give up. I am suggesting however that when you lose, if you did your best, you won't win them all. It's not that kind of world.

Raising the bar means just that: raising your self-expectations higher. People tend to get into ruts of performance. They accept their: $50,000 job, 50 million dollar business, being No two, the inevitable loss of some kind, or retirement from anywhere between 45 and 65 years of age.

I say: no way. I can change the status quo, achieve more, become better, decide to do more with less, pour it on and I can raise my personal bar to any position I choose. If do not cross the bar, it doesn't matter. Life is not about crossing the bar, it is about the thrill, joy and pleasure in trying to cross the bar. There is a distinct difference here, one that I want to ensure you understand. Having goals is important, but working toward goals is more important.

Where is your bar set?

Low enough so you can have a life filled with accomplishments?
So high that you continually stretch yourself to climb higher.
Somewhere in between: safe yet a little challenging?

Each of us can do more. I am not suggesting you become a workaholic. I love to play, relax, read, travel and do nothing. But I am also a believer in pouring it on. Most of us could accomplish a great deal more than we do. We only need to create the desire, get organized, have balance in our lives, and go for it.

Where in your life could you be accomplishing more? In your career? Personal life? Outside interests? A new hobby? A new sport?

Don't wait. The clock is ticking. Before you know it you may be too old, too tired, too bored, or too sick to pour it on. And don't worry about missing the mark or failing.

You need to fail often to succeed sooner.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/375460

 

This is such a good topic to discuss because we were able to point out examples of the bar being raised in every aspect of their lives, from swimming to school, and what is to come in their lives from colleges to future jobs. I hope everyone will take this message and apply it to however they feel will make their life better.

___________________________________________________________________________

Age Group FYI #21 LC 2012- Monday May 7th, 2012-Goal Sheets

I had to very important announcements during Mondays meeting, one being there is NO practice Thursday through Saturday, due to the meet this weekend. Also we are collecting a mass lost and found already so we are going to put out the lost and found every Monday for the kids to go through. Whatever is not taken I will be bringing to Goodwill, this will include clothes, shoes, water bottle, etc. No equipment will be donated until a later date.

On Monday we had our goal meeting for the summer. My goal for the kids is for them to take ownership in their goals and their training. I want them to be able to make the connection to their goals by knowing their best times, best practice times, and their paces for several events to help them while they train. I believe by doing this it will make practice more enjoyable because they will understand what they are doing and make the connection to the hard work and goals at the end of the season. If the kids have question about the goal sheet please have them come talk to me at practice.

I have attached the goal sheet to this email for those that missed Monday or need a new one.

Age Group Goal Sheet LC 2012

Thanks for all the support.

Mike

 

 

Age Group FYI #20 LC 2012, Monday April 30th, 2012

Today’s Monday meeting topic again was taking from the blog by the author of The Talent Code. The focus of the article is using the small victories to make big strides. This is something we have talked about before but article hopefully helps the kids use the small wins idea in the competitiveness of a sport. Below is the article:   

Most of us instinctively spend a lot of time and energy seeking the big breakthrough: that magical moment when, after a lot of effort, everything finally clicks: when you play the song perfectly, ace the test, win the big game. Those moments are incredibly satisfying. But they’re also a problem.

Here’s why: focusing on the big breakthrough can cause you to overreach. It can create a steady diet of disappointment (after all, breakthroughs are rare, by definition). Worse, you stop focusing on the smaller, incremental things that really matter.

The best performers and teachers I’ve seen don’t get caught up in seeking big breakthrough moments. Instead, they hunt the little breakthroughs — the small, seemingly insignificant progressions that create steady daily progress. In short, they love baby steps.

Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer explore this idea in their fascinating book The Progress Principle. In it, they analyze 12,000 diary entries from 238 subjects to get a picture of the subjects’ inner work lives. They conclude that the common trait of highly successful subjects is that they are focused on achieving “small wins” — those tiny, daily progressions that  don’t seem like much but which add up, over time, to big things.

The payoffs of a “small-win” mindset are clear: you tend to be less disappointed, and more motivated. You stay focused on the present.  You don’t overreach by taking shortcuts and trying to do everything at once.

Perhaps most important, the “small-win” approach is aligned with the way your brain is built to learn: chunk by chunk, connection by connection, rep by rep. As John Wooden said, “Don’t look for the big, quick improvement. Seek the small improvement one day at a time. That’s the only way it happens – and when it happens, it lasts.”

A few ideas for a small-win mindset:

  • Keep a daily notebook: Name the small changes you make each day.
  • When you get a small win, freeze: Don’t breeze past small improvements; instead, take a few seconds to acknowledge and celebrate them.
  • Aim for a daily SAP — Smallest Achievable Perfection. Pick one little thing to perfect in a single day — one move, one action, one chunk. Work on it until it’s polished, until you can’t not do it right.

Age Group FYI #19 LC 2012, Monday April 23, 2012

 Just a few housekeeping items before we start – Please get your sign-ups in for the Poseidon Classic in May – the meet is filling up fast and the sign-up date has been moved up to 4/25/12.  I thought that we had a good first meet and it was great to be in our new home.  For this week’s Monday meeting, we discussed a chapter from “The Lombardi Rules” book – entitled” Work harder than everybody”.  This chapter fits into many of my previous topics about working harder in order to achieve your goals.  The very first sentence in the chapter is “Don’t buy the myth of the overnight success” - this one sentence sums up what every swimmer should recognize as the truth.  We live in a world where instant gratification is the norm. 

                Lombardi placed great emphasis on practice.  With hard work, practice, and discipline, his players would gain complete confidence in their ability to execute on the playing field.  This same principle can be applied to the swimming pool.  It is in this discipline of hard work and training, investing those countless hours of practice – that will lead to mastery.  It takes a skill from the conscious level to just being the way you do things, i.e. automatic. 

                Here are three things techniques to make sure you are working hard:

Perfect your discipline – hard work is discipline; focused training that develops self-control.  It helps you make the hard decisions, endure pain, and stay on track despite stress, pressure, and fear.

Invest in your talent – All too often, our culture celebrates success without effort.  All too often, these stories prove to be untrue.  You have a duty to invest in your talent, for the long term.

Start at home – Hard work starts with you, if everyone sees you put in more effort than they did, and achieve, there is a greater chance that you will influence them.  They will start to work harder and it will create a greater team.

 

Age Group FYI #18 SC 2011-12, Monday March 26, 2012

                For this week’s Monday meeting we discussed a principal from “The Talent Code” by Daniel Coyle.  We have talked in the past regarding Mr. Coyle’s topic of the 10,000 hours.  There was a recent update on The Talent Code website that I thought would be relevant for the upcoming weeks. 

Okay, it’s happened: 10,000 hours is officially in the mainstream. Athletes, musicians, students, businesspeople are counting away, waiting for their practice odometer to tick over and — presto! — they’ll be world-class experts.  Sorry, but that ain’t how it works.  Why? Because when you count the hours, it’s easy to lose track of the real goal: finding ways to constantly reach past the edge of your current ability.  The real lesson of 10K is not about quantity; it’s about quality. It’s about getting the maximum possible gain in the shortest amount of time — and to get that, you don’t focus on the time, but on the gain. You put your focus on improving the practice, which happens two ways: through better methods or increased intensity.

To be clear:

  • 1. Certain kinds of learning — deep, or deliberate practice — are transformative.
  • 2. That transformation is a construction process.
  • 3. That construction process depends on your intensive reaching and repeating in the sweet spot on the edge of your ability.

You are what you count. If you count hours, you’ll get hours. But if you find a good way of measuring your intensity, or measuring your improvement, that’s what you’ll get.

I have been trying to bring this point home to the kids.  Coming to practice and swimming up and down the pool is not going to make them better.  They need to constantly practice for a purpose and push past their comfort levels to get their maximum goals.  I also wanted to take a minute to talk about my topic from the previous weeks Monday meeting – Which was “There is no App for a best time” – In today’s fast past instant gratification world, people are used to getting things easier.  Sports are one of those rare things nowadays where there is no App to take the place for hard work.  In order to improve and get a best time – kids need to put in hard work in practice on a consistent basis.

 

Age Group FYI #17 SC 2011-12,Monday Feb. 20th, 2012

Announcements: There will be NO Thursday 7PM practice. There will be NO Friday or Saturday practice as well, due to the Regional Champs. If anyone is in town during those times, they can come to the Sr. Group practice. Don’t forget your championship suits for the meet and to shave. We have not worked hard all year to swim slow. Be 100% committed to swim FAST!

                The main topic of today’s meeting was again an article out of this month’s issue of Slash Magazine. Swimming Faster When It Counts, Top Ten Mental Toughness Tips. Before I reviewed the article I did mention to the kids about keeping up with their nutrition as we head into championship season, making sure to have a healthy diet to keep our energy levels up as we continue to swim fast in practice.

                As mentioned above the article is the one about mental toughness.  I will not re-write the article but I would like to list the 10 helpful tips.

1.        Stay calm and loose pre-race

2.       Leave your goals at home on race day

3.       Stay in your own lane

4.       Stay in the “Now” before and during your race

5.       Be aware whenever your concentration drifts and immediately bring it back

6.       Keep your race focus on feel, on not thoughts

7.       Have Fun

8.       Focus only on things that you can control

9.       Know that last minute doubts and negative thoughts are normal

10.   Trust and let it happen

This is one of the best articles I have ever read in Splash. It is very simple to the point and makes complete sense. A lot of the tips above have been discussed with the group already this year..

I really like number 2 because for the last month we have been emphasizing fast swimming no matter what, at practice, which will lead to fast swimming at meets. If you are doing this then your goals won’t matter at a meet, you will be swimming fast and racing which will help you reach you goals. As the article mentions goals are to be used as motivation each and every day leading up to a meet, not at the meet, the work is over and it’s time to race.

Number 9 is another one I like because we have never addressed the issue that we as human beings will always have doubt, but it’s how we handle it and accept it that will make a difference. As we get nervous for anything doubt and disbelief will try to creep into our heads, but if we flood our thoughts with positive experiences then we can drown out the negative thoughts.

This is a great article to keep and re-read as we head into our championship meet. One last thought I left with the kids, which refers to number 7; these meets coming up are not the most important meets in their lives. They will have other opportunities at these same meets in the future to swim fast, so HAVE FUN swimming fast. Be together as a TEAM, support one and other, good or bad, and the meets will become that much more FUN!

_____________________________________________________________________________

Age Group FYI # 16 SC 2011-12, Monday February 13th,  2012

Announcements: There will be NO practice at 7 PM Friday February 17.

For today’s meeting I just made a list of reminders for the kids as we head into our championship meets. Nothing important but I felt they could use a little reminder of a few things to stay focus as we head down the stretch of another successful season.

1.       Keep your goals in mind during practice. That is why you have been practicing hard all year. Don’t bring your goals to the meet they won’t help you there.

2.       Do your homework. Re-read some of the things we have been talking about all year. Something this year has to have hit home, maybe you’ll pick up something you missed.

3.       Stayed focus on the details, small details always add up to big things. Make the connection of what you are doing in the water to what you want to accomplish in the meet.

4.       Increase Intensity. Both in effort and thought. Use both to gain that little bit of an advantage.

5.       Increase rest outside the pool. Eliminate extra activities, if this can be avoided. Go to bed a half an hour earlier. If you did this you might gain a whole night sleep in just 2 weeks.

6.       Mind your nutrition. More water. More color at meal time and maybe cut back a little on serving sizes since we will be coming down in yardage and intensity at practice.

7.       Think about a routine you like to do at a swim meet, what relaxes you?

8.       Talk to your teachers at school. Get your school work ahead of time; let them know you will not be there for Friday. 13 and over’s you have three 4 hour study halls between prelims and finals ever session.

9.       Pack extra suits (both warm up and tech), caps and goggles. Everyone is expected to shave unless otherwise told by your coach.  

Hope this list helps when planning for the weekend, any question the kids can always ask me at practice. Let’s get fired up to swim fast! Go Poseidon!

_________________________________________________________________________

Age Group FYI #15 SC 2011-12, Monday February 6th, 2012

Announcements: No Friday 7pm practice, Sign up for your championship meets.

If you have not order a championship suit, please get with Marla ASAP. Below is an article I found about 9 mental skills successful athletes use within their sport and in life.

The Nine Mental Skills of Successful Athletes

You don’t have to be a professional athlete or an Olympic champion to be a successful athlete. Nor do you have to have a room full of trophies, win a state championship, or make the front page of the sports section.

What successful athletes have in common is that their sport is important to them and they’re committed to being the best that they can be within the scope of their limitations. They set high, realistic goals for themselves and train and play hard. They are successful because they are pursuing their goals and enjoying their sport.

There are nine, specific mental skills that contribute to success in sports. They are all learned and can be improved practice.

A Brief List of the Nine Mental Skills

Successful Athletes:

  1. Choose and maintain a positive attitude.
  2. Maintain a high level of self-motivation.
  3. Set high, realistic goals.
  4. Deal effectively with people.
  5. Use positive self-talk.
  6. Use positive mental imagery.
  7. Manage anxiety effectively.
  8. Manage their emotions effectively.
  9. Maintain concentration.

Detailed Descriptions of the Nine Mental Skills

1. Attitude

Successful athletes:

  • Realize that attitude is a choice.
  • Choose an attitude that is predominately positive.
  • View their sport as an opportunity to compete against themselves and learn from their successes and failures.
  • Pursue excellence, not perfection, and realize that they, as well as their coaches, teammates, officials, and others are not perfect.
  • Maintain balance and perspective between their sport and the rest of their lives.
  • Respect their sport, other participants, coaches, officials, and themselves.

2. Motivation

Successful athletes:

  • Are aware of the rewards and benefits that they expect to experience through their sports participation.
  • Are able to persist through difficult tasks and difficult times, even when these rewards and benefits are not immediately forthcoming.
  • Realize that many of the benefits come from their participation, not the outcome.

3. Goals and Commitment

Successful athletes:

  • Set long-term and short-term goals that are realistic, measurable, and time-oriented.
  • Are aware of their current performance levels and are able to develop specific, detailed plans for attaining their goals.
  • Are highly committed to their goals and to carrying out the daily demands of their training programs.

4. People Skills

Successful athletes:

  • Realize that they are part of a larger system that includes their families, friends, teammates, coaches, and others.
  • When appropriate, communicate their thoughts, feelings, and needs to these people and listen to them as well.
  • Have learned effective skills for dealing with conflict, difficult opponents, and other people when they are negative or oppositional.

5. Self-Talk

Successful athletes:

  • Maintain their self-confidence during difficult times with realistic, positive self-talk.
  • Talk to themselves the way they would talk to their own best friend
  • Use self-talk to regulate thoughts, feelings and behaviors during competition.

6. Mental Imagery

Successful athletes:

  • Prepare themselves for competition by imagining themselves performing well in competition.
  • Create and use mental images that are detailed, specific, and realistic.
  • Use imagery during competition to prepare for action and recover from errors and poor performances.

7. Dealing Effectively with Anxiety

Successful athletes:

  • Accept anxiety as part of sport.
  • Realize that some degree of anxiety can help them perform well.
  • Know how to reduce anxiety when it becomes too strong, without losing their intensity.

8. Dealing Effectively with Emotions

Successful athletes:

  • Accept strong emotions such as excitement, anger, and disappointment as part of the sport experience.
  • Are able to use these emotions to improve, rather than interfere with high level performance

9. Concentration

Successful athletes:

  • Know what they must pay attention to during each game or sport situation.
  • Have learned how to maintain focus and resist distractions, whether they come from the environment or from within themselves.
  • Are able to regain their focus when concentration is lost during competition.
  • Have learned how to play in the “here-and-now”, without regard to either past or anticipated future events.

Application of the Nine Mental Skills to Non-sport Performance Situations

The nine mental skills associated with athletic success are the same mental skills associated with performance in a wide variety of non-sport, performance situations. Let’s take a look at some of these.

Examples of Performance Situations

  • An important job interview
  • Performing a solo with a symphony orchestra
  • Auditioning for a role in a drama production
  • Giving a class presentation
  • Taking a driver’s examination
  • Giving a talk to the PTA
  • Testifying in court
  • Taking the state medical exam
  • A firefighter entering a burning building
  • Participating in a military or police attack

_________________________________________________________________

Age Group FYI #14 SC 2011-12, Monday January 30th

 Parents,

This weekend is Splash For Cash, hope everyone has been doing their part in collecting money. Our time in the water will be from 8:30 to 10:00am. Please plan to arrive early to get check in on time so we can get in the water promptly at 8:30.

Also just as a reminder there will be NO Friday 7pm practice Feb 3rd.

Below is our topic for the week. This is a list of 10 ways Michael Jordan used to be more competitive in his basketball career and on the golf course now.

 

1. Focus on the little things.During my basketball career, I always told myself to focus on the little things because little things added up to big things. All the fundamentals that I had worked on at home and at practice for all those years added up to big things for me in basketball. Swimming is no different. Don't assume, things will just happen at a meet, they must be practiced over and over.

2. Have total confidence in what you can do.If you have 100 percent confidence that you swim to your best ability that day then most of the time you will.

3. Don't think about the prize; think about the work.We have been talking about this all year. Starting with the first day of practice and focusing on the process.

4. Keep it simple.Don’t over think. Stick to the basics and what you know you can do. It will help you build your confidence and perform better.

5. Control your emotions until the round is over.Celebrating during a swim can be a good thing if it inspires you to keep doing great things. But be careful not to overdo it. Sometimes, celebrating too much adds pressure and makes you feel like you've got to live up to it the rest of the swim.

6.Use tough losses for motivation.Turning negatives into positives has always worked for me. I think back to when I was cut from my high school basketball team as a sophomore. That was the biggest disappointment of my sports career, but it only made me work harder. Imagine if we take a disappointment like this in swimming and used it every day in practice. I am willing to bet we would have some pretty great practices all the time.

7.Competitors always want to have something riding on the outcome.Think back to all the “deals” we make in practice, there is something riding on that deal and you swim really fast, the competitor in you really comes out.

8.Power of positive self talk. Michael Jordan uses “trash talk” to motivate him, but we turned this around to talk trash to our self to motivate us. Saying the right things to your self will help you pump you up to swim fast.

9. Nervousness is not a bad thing. I was nervous a lot of times before games. The key is, does that nervousness go away once the ball is thrown up because of your preparation and your routine help relax you. Swimming can work the same way if you put in the work to prepare. Yeah, you're going to be nervous the first swim, but all it takes is one good swim, and that nervousness goes away. If you have doubts, nervousness will expose that. At some point you say, I know I can swim fast. I'm gonna keep it simple.

10. Learn from others competitiveness.Why does other succeed and learn from them. We can all learn from those around us, work ethic, preparation, and or race strategedies. Use them to gain a competitive edge.

______________________________________________________________
 

Age Group FYI #13 SC 2011-12, Monday January 23rd

Announcements: Splash for cash is coming soon, our group goal is to have the highest average for the team so lets make it happen. We have the largest group so lets do our part in supporting the team.

There will be NO practice at 7 PM Friday night January 27th.

The 3 Levels of Effective Practice

I’m always on the lookout for new ways to understand highly effective practice, and recently came across a keeper fromVern Gambetta, the well-known coach and athletic consultant. It’s called “winning the workout.”

At its core is the idea that there are three essential ways of approaching a practice session.

  • Level 1) You show up. You do the job exactly as you’re told to do it; nothing more, nothing less. You get a little better.
  • Level 2) You show up. You do the job, and you target certain tasks that’ll help you toward your goal. You work the workout, push yourself, think about technique. You get a lot better.
  • Level 3) You show up, having thought about how today’s session fits into the larger goal. You work very hard, pushing yourself into the discomfort zone over and over, with full commitment. Later, you reflect/analyze/critique your performance with a cool, objective eye. You get a LOT better, creating what Gambetta calls “the quantum leap.”

Think of the three levels as bronze, silver, and gold. Level 3 is winning the workout.

Traditionally, when we talk about effective practice, we use the idea of focus — the amount of attention a person puts into their actions. After all, that’s the one word parents and coaches often yell from the sidelines — “Focus!” (And it usually works about as well as you’d expect.)

One reason I like Gambetta’s concept is that it takes us beyond the primitive idea of focus and into the more targeted idea of investment — sensing and measuring the total amount of time and energy put into the process of getting better. I also like it because it embraces the semi-revolutionary idea that some of the most vital work happens away from the practice space, in the time we use to reflect, strategize, plan, and figure out honest answers to those two simple but immensely difficult questions we face every day: where are we right now, really? Where we want to be tomorrow? Because the reality of this sport is that you can’t hide from your results. You can’t lie about how hard you work like in a team sport, it’s easy to hide on the field with other teammates winning the game for you.

The more immediate question is, how do you increase investment and win the workout? Here are two ideas.

  • 1) Notebooks. Writing stuff down is a good way to increase planning, reflection, and understanding; it lets us think our way past obstacles and see ourselves clearly. Check out writingathletes.com for some good ideas and tools.
  • 2) Make a habit of connecting every session, every drill, to the longterm goal. One way to think about this is to think like a movie camera, zooming in and out. Zoom in on the task, then zoom out to show where it fits in the bigger picture.

Age Group FYI #12 SC 2011-12, Monday January 16th

Announcements: Please continue to get pledges for Splash for Cash on February 4th. Keep checking the website for practice changes due to upcoming meets.

Today we talked more about the qualities of being great. I recently received a book (for my birthday) titled: Greatness, The 16 Characteristics of True Champions by Don Yaeger. I told the kids that there really isn’t one correct or right idea, there are just many thought on the same idea interpreted in difference ways, so many of the characteristics presented in this book are one we have discussed already. Since there are 16 of them I believe I can make 16 different meetings if need be, but for this meeting I went over what he describes as; what greatness is… and what greatness is NOT.

Greatness is…

Greatness is available to all of us. Greatness is available to each one of us if we are willing to do common things uncommonly well.

Greatness does what others will not. Many people will never begin the effort to change because it appears too daunting, uncomfortable, or inconvenient.

Greatness lifts- and recognizes- those around it. Greatness recognizes the responsibility it has to reach beyond itself to encourage and empower others.

Greatness is well rounded. An individual who truly espouses Greatness is someone who pursues it in every avenue of life.

Greatness has vision. Greatness also has a long-range view of things, understanding that sacrifice in the present can mean major dividends in the future.

Greatness is humble. Greatness works for the goal not the praise. True Greatness gains recognition because it has been observed by others, not advertised by the individual.

Greatness overcomes. The Great ones also recognize that true Greatness comes about as a result of blood, sweat and tears.

Greatness is the product of choices. Greatness lies not in what we’re given, but in what we do with what we‘re given.

Greatness is a way of life. Greatness is the persistent pursuit of professional and personal excellence.

Greatness Is Not…

Greatness is not genetic. We all posses the potential for Greatness, but Greatness itself is not an inborn trait.

Greatness is not about the record book. The simple truth is that Greatness is not about winning but is something achieved only through a wholeness of self.

Greatness does not take short cuts. Greatness cannot be achieved by seeking the back door to success.

Greatness isn’t perfect. Great players have bad games. Great people have bad days. Flaws don’t eliminate you from the pursuit of Greatness; they make you human.

Greatness is not a fad. Greatness is not defined by one moment, there are plenty of one hit wonders out there.

Greatness is not the same as fame. Greatness is a philosophy gained through the genuine manner in which a person lives his or her life.

__________________________________________________________________________

 

Age Group FYI #11 SC 2011-2012, January 9th, 2012

The following is message from the author of The Talent Code from his blog:

I’ve been traveling lately in the business world and in the sports/music worlds. No matter where I go, I’m hearing conversations about the importance of failure. About how struggle makes you smarter, how mistakes are useful. Failure, it seems, is sexy.

Take Silicon Valley, for instance, where working on a failed startup is often regarded as a badge of honor superior to a Ph.D. Or education reformers talking about creating spaces for “productive struggle.” Or coaches extolling the importance of 10,000 hours of intensive practice, where you try, fail, and try again.

All in all, I think this is a really good thing.  But here’s the catch: all failure is not created equal. In other words, some types of failure are smarter than others because they create learning. Other failures are worse, because they create more failures. The question is, how do we tell smart failure from dumb failure?

One way to approach this question is to use the Goldilocks model, inspired by the work of Dr. Robert Bjork and Lev Vygotsky. As in the story, there are three zones of failure: too soft, too hard, and just right.

  • Zone 1: The Comfort Zone:Here, you’re able to hit your target more than 90 percent of the time. You’re in control; relaxed, confident. You’re not reaching past your current abilities, but operating firmly within them. You’re like an advanced skier on a beginner run, carving turns with ease and grace.
  • Zone 2: The Thrash Zone:Here, you’re failing more than half the time. When you succeed, it’s mostly because you’re getting lucky. You’re behaving like a beginning skier fighting his way down a steep expert run: occasionally you might make a good turn, but more often you’re just trying to get to the bottom in one piece.
  • Zone 3: The Sweet Spot:Here, you’re in between Comfort and Thrashing. You’re putting forth maximal effort and you’re succeeding between 60 percent and 80 percent of the time. You’re failing — sometimes spectacularly — and you’re paying attention, and learning from each screwup.

As with Goldilocks, this goal of this rule is to help us make the right choice between different options. To put this idea to work, here’s a quiz:

  • Should a student cram for a history test by (A) reading a chapter over and over five times, or (B) by reading the chapter once and then constructing an outline of the key points?
  • Should a business train its new sales force by (A) sending them into the field to see how they do or (B) by constructing a series of role-playing exercises led by a master coach?
  • Should a pianist spend her practice hour  (A) playing a song perfectly, over and over, or (B) isolating the weak spots in a new song, repeating them until they’re improved?

The basic rule in all cases is to choose (B), and aim for the sweet spot. Steer clear of comfort and thrashing, especially when you’re starting something new.  The second rule is that when in doubt, keep things small and simple. The smaller and simpler the task, the easier it is to locate your sweet spot.

 

Please take a look at this Gatorade commercial as it is a great message to the kids.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQnQWdrXNMk

 

Age Group FYI #10 SC 2011-2012,  January 3rd, 2012

Announcements; There will be NO Friday (1/6) 7:05 practice.

What It Takes To Be Great

                Tonight’s Monday meeting was taken from an article written by Jefferey Colvin from the 2007 American Swimming Magazine.  Research now shows that the lack of natural talent is irrelevant to great success.  The secret?  Painful and demanding practice and hard work.  I asked the kids why they thought Tiger Woods and Warren Buffett were successful.  Were they “naturals” right from birth?  No, they achieved greatness only through an enormous amount of hard work over many years.  And not just any hard work – but work of a particular type that’s demanding and painful.  Buffet has been known to spend hours studying potential investments, and we all know how much Tiger Woods has been known to practice. 

                The good news is that your lack of a natural gift is irrelevant – talent has little or nothing to do with greatness.  You can make yourself into any number of things, and you can even make yourself great.  One major realization is that nobody is great without hard work.  Greatness is not handed to anyone; it requires a lot of hard work.  However, some people can work hard for a long time and not become great –Why?  Some of the best people in their certain fields devote a large amount of time to what is called “deliberate practice”.  Example – a golfer hitting a bucket of 100 balls 3 days out of the week or hitting an eight iron 300 times with the goal of leaving the ball within 20 ft. of the pin 80% of the time (the golfer hitting the eight iron is more deliberate and in turn more likely to be successful)

                Consistency is also important.  We discussed the 10,000 hours principle.  This is discussed in detail in the book “The Talent Code” and describes how in some fields it typically takes 10,000 hours of deliberate work before greatness.  More deliberate practice =better performance.  Michael Jordan was known to practice intensely on top of team practices (he had to practice more – he was cut from his HS basket ball team).  Tiger Woods was figured to have about 15 yrs of practice by the time he became the youngest Amateur winner (at age of 18yo). 

                For most people, work is hard enough without pushing harder.  Those extra steps are so difficult and painful they almost never get done – that’s the way it must be.  If great performance were easy – it wouldn’t be rare.  The reality is that we are not hostage to some naturally granted level of talent.  We can make ourselves what we will ourselves to be.  This is not a popular idea – some people think that they will find their talent and coast to fame and riches – which is why when things become hard they just assume that they are not gifted and give up.  We can’t expect everyone to be great – it is too demanding – but isn’t it nice to know that greatness isn’t reserved to just a few preordained people – it is available to you and everyone.  

 

 

 

Age Group FYI #9 SC 2011- 12 , November 28th, 2011

Announcements: Please check the website for practice changes and warm up times for the meets this weekend or any emails I PSDN may send out.

The topic for this week’s meeting was meet preparation. There are three areas that we believe is important for the kids to focus on before each meet.  1) Rest 2) Nutrition and 3) Mental readiness. Putting these three areas together with the hard work in the pool will help create opportunities for fast swimming.

1)      Rest- It has always been my job to rest the kids in the water with the workouts we are doing in preparation for a championship meet, it is the swimmers responsibility to rest outside the pool by getting to bed a little earlier and trying to avoid any extra physical activity that may drain their energy.

2)      Nutrition- My first thought to the kids was to watch what they eat as we go into the meet because we are dropping the intensity down they may not be burning as many calories so my suggestion is to eat smaller meals but continue to snack healthy. The other suggestion was taken directly from the Tips section of US Swimming website. It was an article called “Things to eat on race day”. Very good and informative for the kids

3)      Mental Readiness- It is always important to reflect back on all the positive things one may have done leading up to race day. Examples would be past races, great practices, and or your favorite routine or food to eat.  Point being flood your mind with positive thoughts and try to recreate moments that get your mind in the right place. Lastly I encouraged them to have FUN! The season is not over, take these upcoming meets as a check point and take the stress out of it and have FUN!

 

Age Group FYI #8 SC 2011-12 November 14th, 2011

Announcements: Please keep checking the website and your meet signups for the December meets.

 “There is no I in Team, but there is in Winning”. I firmly believe those great teams are made because of great individuals within the team that do their particular job and take care of their own business. Think of the greatest football teams ever, in short, the quarterback throws the ball, the wide receivers catch the ball, the running back runs the ball, and the blockers block, without each individual doing their job the team will lose. Think of any bad team in professional sport and you will surely find individuals that don’t do their job on the field or in most cases off the field socially and morally, those teams are constantly in trouble with the law.

Below is an article/blog I found on the topic:

“There is no I in Team” Michael Jordan was reminded by Chicago Bulls assistant coach Tex Winters after Jordan scored  a straight 20 points. Jordan returned Winter’s comment with “There’s ‘I’ in ‘win.’” Some might find Jordan’s quip a bit arrogant but you know what I think? I think he is right. If you want to have a winning team, you have to mind the “I’s” within the team.

I speak from experience when I say that rallying your team to act with unity and work together towards a common goal is not enough. If you want a winning team, you need to make sure that each one of them is responsible and committed to contributing to the team and are accountable for their performance and behavior. What I mean by that is as a leader you see the individuals doing their utmost best and readily take accountability for their misses. They don’t go around blaming everyone but themselves when things go wrong. I think that being committed and accountable are words that describe individuals in the team and not the team itself.  It is also something that individuals declare and prove to themselves. No amount of good teamwork can be achieved if you don’t have individuals who are responsible, committed and accountable in your team.

What to do? There is no “I” in Team but there are two in “Winning.” Let me wear that leader’s hat now and see how this idea applies. The first “I,” I reserve to myself as a leader. If I want to have a winning team, I should be able to demonstrate responsibility, commitment and accountability myself. This means charting the course, demonstrating the right behaviors, enabling my team, looking for opportunities to change and improve and lastly, encourage my team to succeed.

“I” will focus at the individual members of a team. I’d like to go back to what I just said. By enabling my team, I mean building it, choosing the right people to come in, making sure that they are made of the right stuff and they are positioned where they can best contribute. Now herein lies the problem. No tool has been proven to be fool-proof in choosing the right team members. We need to make sure that we have people who are in it to win it.

To be able to harness the ‘I’s of a winning team, leaders, and everyone is a leader not just me the coach, need to spend a fair amount of time evaluating their own leadership effectiveness and sharpen their skills, then they should spend an even more amount of time knowing the individuals in the team, communicating with them and helping them succeed by seeing to it that they are responsible, committed and accountable.

Hey, who said winning is easy?

________________________________________________________________________________

Age Group FYI #7 SC 2011-12, November 7, 2011

Announcements: Nothing major this week, please sign up for your December meets, remember they are our midseason championship caliber meets and we want 100% participation if possible.

Monday meetings topic was again on hard work, but with a different twist. We look at how it applies to life, school, and of course swimming. I read some highlights to the kids from an article I got out of my ASCA Newsletter titled Hard Work by John Leonard.

We believe hard work is it’s own reward.

We believe that everyone benefits from hard work. It teaches all of us that nothing is given to us, it has to be earned. It teaches us that life is not fair; sometimes those who work the hardest are not rewarded the most. But without hard work, there is a reduced likelihood of reward.  Hard work “feels good.” It makes us feel good, valuable, capable and self-sufficient. One of the few things we can control in this world is the level of our own effort. When we work harder than we thought possible for us, we open new doors or possibility in our lives.

We believe that Resiliency is THE great trait to learn from swimming.

Everyone gets knocked down in life. The critical thing is to learn to bounce back up immediately and re-double your efforts.  Children need hard challenges. They need to “fail” as often as they succeed. They need to learn to quickly and effectively bounce back up and get back to work. 

The best example I could give in practice is when the kids were in the 1st grade preparing for their first spelling test. When they got the list they couldn’t spell the first word but practicing all week they would fail over and over again until the test on Friday, when hopefully they would get an A on the test.

I know we live in a world of instant gratification, cell phones, internet, and even instant coffee. Gone are the days when people use to wait for a fresh brewed cup of coffee that would drip one drip at a time. Hard work and resiliency seems to be lost in translation as our lives get “easier.” Hopefully we are teaching the value of hard work and the rewards that come from it.

__________________________________________________________________________-

Age Group FYI #6 SC 2011-12, October 31st, 2011

Announcements: We are back on our regular schedule, YEAH! SEVA T-shirts orders need to be in ASAP (shirts are for everyone). Please sign up for your December meet.

Below is an article I read to the kids about dealing with pain during a race but most importantly dealing with pain in practice. We talked about the difference between good pain, the one you want to be in for a long time and the bad pain, sudden and sharp that come out of nowhere.

Reading through this reminded me of when I was swimming and how I use to use many of the tips they are recommending. This is something I will be reminding the kids about as they are striving very hard to reach their goals

Reverse Psychology - Pain Is Good! - Mind Training Tips for Swimmers

From Craig Townsend

Pain is often be more of a mental barrier than a physical one. Some time ago I wrote about how it's possible (through the mind) to actually delay the feelings of pain at the end of a tough race or training set - or even make it disappear completely! This is possible because your mind has the capacity to release morphine into the bloodstream, a chemical which is one of the most powerful painkillers known on this planet, and a chemical which is used daily in hospitals for accident victims.

There will, however, be many swimmers out there who still experience pain at the end of races, and so this tip is designed for you, to help you overcome pain by using a new mental attitude. To perform at your best, it's essential to 'make a friend' out of the pain. You see, the more you hate the pain, the more painful it will become, and the more it will slow you down! So here are a few different approaches you can try, just experiment with them and see which ones work best for you, because no two swimmers are the same.

If pain 'hits' you at the end of a race, one approach is to think to yourself "this is going to make me swim even faster, because the sooner I finish the race, the sooner I'll be over the pain". In this way, you are actually using the pain as motivation to swim faster, by turning it into an advantage instead of a major liability - and this works much better than 'hating' the pain.

Another approach (which has had some great results) is to see the pain as a 'process' instead of a 'place' - this means that instead of thinking that you are IN pain, think to yourself that you are MOVING THROUGH the pain. Move through the pain, instead of being in it - this makes a big difference mentally!

Sometimes your mind may even 'switch the pain off' altogether, if it's convinced that you have completely moved through it (it does this by releasing morphine into the system). This means that it's actually possible to move 'through and BEYOND' the pain, which is much better than being IN it!

Another comforting thought some swimmers use is to remember that all your race competitors are going through the pain as well - but you know that you will handle it better! Going through pain in one thing, but no-one wants to go through it alone! So remember that every other swimmer is probably experiencing it, and it will just be a matter of who handles it best (and makes sure it's you).

Last of all, pain is an emotional thing. Don't let it take you over emotionally - because once it does, it's got you. Remind yourself that it will only be a temporary feeling, not permanent, and that it can only dominate you if you allow it to. Don't allow it. Stay strong mentally, and you can dominate the pain, instead of the other way around.

_______________________________________________________________________

Age Group FYI #5 SC 2011-12, October 24th, 2011

Announcements: Nothing major with the exception of staying on top of meet sign up and planning for your December meet. I have kept everyone in the loop on the light situation, which hopefully will be resolved soon.

Today’s Monday meeting topic was an article out of this month’s Swimming World Magazine, the title of the article is The Secret To Swimming Success. This was another great article to review with the kids because a lot of points the article makes are topic or issues we have covered over and over at one point or another. What it boils down to is that there is no one secret or magic elixir to make you success or fast in swimming, it’s just plan hard work.  The following are bullet point the article points out that will help you achieve success through hard work.

Who Wins?

1.       Do things differently than everyone else. To win, you have to do it differently than everyone who has gone before you.

2.       Do new things before anyone else does them. Winning in swimming is more than just toughing the wall first. It’s about doing everything in training and preparation before anyone else does.

3.       Do different things than everyone else. Doing the same things as everyone else and expecting to win is to rely on luck, hope and good fortune- certainly not the recommended ways for experiencing success.

4.       Work harder than everyone else. The real secret to success is hard work- and that’s why it remains and secret.  Being tall, being strong, being powerful, having great technique- none of these factors alone lead to victory. But add desire to work hard consistently and anything is possible.

5.       Never ever give up. Hardly anyone succeeds the first time. Unfortunately, many people will try something once, and if they are not immediately successful, they give up.

So what’s the answer to who wins and who succeeds? There is no right answer but here is something to live and work by… ‘Cause that’s the real key to success- give everything you’ve got …to everything you do… every time you do it!

Age Group FYI #4 SC 2011-12, October 17th, 2011

Announcements: I have been sending out daily updates about the pool, other than that please stay on top of meet sign ups as they come up on us fast. Please sign up for the team travel meet ASAP.

The following Monday meeting is entitled "A Gauge for Measuring Effectice Practice". This is from a blog by the author of The Talent Code. I used most of it and changed a little to fit swimming, but there some great stuff for the kids on studying.

_________

If you distilled all the new science about talent development into two words of advice, they would be “practice better.”

That’s it. Practice. Better.

Forget everything else about your genes, your potential — it’s all just noise. The most basic truth is that if you practice better, you’ll develop your talent — and you won’t develop your talent unless you practice better. Period.

For most of us, that’s precisely where we bump into a common problem: how? Specifically, which practice method to choose? Do we focus on repeating a skill we’ve got, or do we work on new skills? What kinds of drills work best? What’s the best way to spend the limited time we’ve got?

When it comes to figuring out how to practice better, we often feel like we’re standing in the cereal aisle of the grocery store. There are lots of seemingly attractive choices. But how do we pick the ones that have the most nutrition, and avoid the ones that are empty calories?

I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately, and I’d like to use this blog as a test drive for a new gauge for comparing practice methods. I’m calling it the R.E.P.S. Gauge.

(Okay, acronyms are cheesy, I know. But they’ve been around for a long time because they work.)

R stands for Reaching/Repeating.

E stands for Engagment.

P stands for Purposefulness

S stands for Strong, Direct, Immediate Feedback.

The idea behind the gauge is simple: you should practice methods that contain these key elements, and avoid methods that don’t. Below, you’ll find a description of each element along with a sample choice to illustrate how it works.

·         Element 1: Reaching and Repeating. Does the practice have you operating on the edge of your ability, reaching and repeating? How many reaches are you making each minute? Each hour?

·         Element 2: Engagement. Is the practice immersive? Does it command your attention? Does it use emotion to propel you toward a goal?

Scenario: a violin student trying to perfect a short, tough passage in a song.

• Student A plays the passage 20 times.

• Student B tries to play the passage perfectly — with zero mistakes — five times in a row. If they make any mistake, the count goes back to zero and they start over.

Result: Student B made the better choice, because the method is more engaging. Playing a passage 20 times in a row is boring, a chore where you’re simply counting the reps until you’re done. But playing 5 perfectly, where any mistake sends you back to zero, is intensively engaging. It’s a juicy little game.

·         Element 3: Purposefulness. Does the task directly connect to the skill you want to build?

Scenario: A swim team keeps losing ground on turns later in there races.

•  Team A practices turns over and  over again from the middle of the pool

• Team B does there turns correct and fast during their sets under pressure and tired when it counts the most.

Result: Team B made the better choice, because their practice connects to the skill you want to build: the ability to do turns correctly under pressure, while exhausted. (No player ever gets to do 50 straight turns in a race)

·         The fourth element: Strong, Direct, Immediate Feedback. In other words, the learner always knows how they’re doing — where they’re making mistakes, where they’re doing well — because the practice is telling them in real time. They don’t need anybody to explain that they need to do X or Y, because it’s clear as a bell.

Scenario:a high school student trying to improve her SAT score.

•  Student A spends a Saturday taking a mock version of the entire SAT test, receiving results back one week later.

• Student B spends a Saturday taking a mini-version of each section, self-grading and reviewing each test in detail as soon as it’s completed.

Result: Student B made the better choice, because the feedback is direct and immediate. Learning immediately where she went wrong (and where she went right) will tend to stick, while learning about it in a week will have little effect.

The idea of this gauge is simple: practices that contain all four of these core elements (R.E.P.S.) are the ones you want to choose, because those are the ones that will produce the most progress in the shortest amount of time. Audit your practices and get rid of the methods that have fewer R.E.P.S. and replace them with methods that have lots.

The other takeaway here is that small, strategic changes in practice can produce huge benefits in learning. Making a little tweak to the learning space — for instance, teaching multiplication through a little juicy game that keeps 30 people on their toes — can have big effects on learning velocity. Spending time strategizing your practice is one of the most effective investments you can make in developing talent.

Age Group FYI #3 SC 2011-12, October 3, 2011

Announcements: No practice changes for this week.

Next week Monday October 10th and Tuesday the 11th there will be NO afternoon practice as the tent will be going up at the Y. Also there will be NO 7:05 PM practice on Wednesday the 12th as we will be having our annual membership meeting at 7:00 at Midlothian Middle. For any new members to Poseidon there will be a new membership meeting at 6:00 at Midlothian Middle on Wednesday October 12th

With all the changes for next week please plan accordingly. Senior mornings are available for all those that want to take advantage of them. That morning runs from 4:50am to 6:20am.

In today’s Monday Meeting, I used and read an article from this month’s issue of Splash Magazine. The title of the article is Getting the Most Out of the Season. This was a great article for the beginning of the season. There is a lot of content that I have already said this season.  I encourage all to re-read this article throughout the year to remind them of their goals. The most important content I took out of this article was the emphasis it put on making the connection to the training that is happening now to the end of the season. If the kids can learn and understand this connection it will make training and the season much more enjoyable.

For all those that were not in attendance at our age group parent meeting, I will send out a copy of the meeting outline with some important highlights from the meeting in the near future.

Age Group FYI #2 SC 2011-12, September 26th,2011

Announcements:

#1- I would like all age group swimmers to have the following equipment, fins, kickboard, snorkel, and recommend a mesh bag to carry this in. Most of you that were on the team last year should have this, if you have lost your snorkel check our lost and found as we have  about 10-15 snorkels. I believe the kids need to do a better job of being responsible for their things, as I pick up equipment every night left behind.

#2- Remind them that their goal sheets are due to me ASAP.

#3- Sign up for your October meets, deadlines are fast approaching. Please have the 12 and under meet sign ups done by Friday, so I may send them in this weekend.

#4- With meets starting up in a couple of weeks please purchase your Poseidon team suit from Marla. We will be wearing our “fast suit” i.e. fast skins and FS pros for our December meets and our end of the season championship meets.

Today’s topic was the acronym WIN NOW. Below are some excerpts I used from a couple of articles I found online.

WIN NOW

WIN NOW; these are two words that can completely change the way you build your business or pursue your life goals. The result of applying the WIN NOW principles are that you indeed will “win now”! But aside from being a nice sounding phrase, WIN NOW can teach an attitude that will empower you to achieve your goals, remind you of what you should be focusing on, and help you take advantage of every opportunity you are given. WIN NOW is the combination of two important acronyms. WIN stands for What’s Important Now? NOW stands for No Opportunity Wasted.

Throughout the day it is really easy to get off track and move away from important action to doing things that are only a waste of time. By asking yourself “What’s Important Now” you can remind yourself that there are things that are important and you can move back to activities that will help you accomplish what is important.

The answer to the WIN question will change throughout your day/practice.At times, WIN will mean giving complete attention to your streamline; at times WIN will mean taking steps towards hitting your goal pace, and at times it will mean being the best teammate you can be. The key is that you SHOULD be doing the important thing at any one moment.

In order to apply WIN you need to have an understanding of what exactly is important.Knowing what’s important comes from an understanding of your mission and your goals. Your personal mission should help you always have a clear understanding of what sort of things are going to be important to you.

After you have clarity around your mission you can set goals. For goals to be effective within the WIN principle you need to have long-term goals that are broken down into short-term goals set on a weekly basis. Each week you should set your priorities in each of the different areas of practice or in your life.If you understand clearly your weekly goals that will allow you to focus on WIN throughout each day. The things that will be important are those things that help you achieve your weekly goals.

The second part of the phrase is NOW, or No Opportunity Wasted.NOW refers to never letting a chance for growth go past you. Opportunities are all around us. There are opportunities in all realms of practice and life – your physical effort, your personal life and or your mental attitude. NOW means that you will be watching for these opportunities, you will recognize them when they present themselves and take advantage of them.

NOW will connect directly with WIN. The opportunities you will look for when applying NOW will be the things that help you achieve the important things from WIN. “No Opportunity Wasted” will help you to look for any opportunity to do the important things that will help you achieve your goals.

By combining NOW and WIN you get the phrase WIN NOW; which is exactly what will happen for you if you continually apply these principles.With WIN you will be always asking yourself “What’s Important Now?” This understanding will allow you to take action towards these goals. NOW will help you to remember to be watching for opportunities throughout your day, and then spur you to take action towards those activities, even if it means moving through your comfort zone and doing things that may cause fear. These actions towards the important things in life will indeed help you WIN NOW.

Is it any different for the rest of us? When we focus on What's Important Now, we become the best we can be during our own most challenging moments. We are deciding that this activity is the most important thing we could be doing in our lives in this moment. We are not experiencing an urge to be somewhere else, to do something else, or to think about something else.

 

Age Group FYI #1 SC 2011-12, September 19,

Parents

Important announcement about practice this Friday September 23; I will conduct a 2:30 practice only. There will be NO 3:20 or 7:05 do to the fact that Ted and I will both be out of town with the senior group. Morning practice is available for those that cannot make Friday afternoon. Please plan your week accordingly. Saturday practice will be held at its normal time 9:00-11:15. Thank you for your understanding.

Age is off to a flying start with excellent attendance. It’s been great to see everyone at practice having a good time and supporting each other. In our Monday meeting (9/19) we talked about the season plan and goals, the kids love this one because it takes the longest so they get to miss a bunch of practice. Instead of going on in a lengthy email I have attached the season plan and goal sheet that I passed out yesterday.  I will also post them online in case there are some lost ones floating around at the Y. Everything I covered in the meeting will be on these attachments.

AGE GROUP GOAL SHEET SC 2011-12

AGE GROUP SEASON PLAN SC 2011-12

 

 

PSDN Strength and Conditioning Program - July 27th

Age Group FYI #27 LC 2011, June 27th

I started the meeting by reminding the group that it is only 3 weeks to Summer Awards and 5 weeks to Age Group Champs. Summer is flying by fast so make sure we are attending our practice session to be prepared for our championship meets.

Please sign up for Summer Awards ASAP. Remember Summer Awards is a meet for those that do not have Age Group Champs cuts or Senior Champs cuts.

Monday’s topic is one that we will revisit early next season but thought it would be appropriate to introduce it on Monday. We talked about what True Grit actually is. I used another article out an ASCA news letter and in that article it defined grit as “endurance in pursuit in long term goals and ability to persist in the face of adversity is a key part of what makes people successful. In a culture that values quick results- this quarter’s numbers, this week’s weight loss, this month’s clickthroughs- grit can be underappreciated secret weapon.”

Grit is not synonymous with hard work. It involves a certain single mindedness. An ungritty prison inmate will formulate a new plan of escape every month, but a gritty prison inmate will tunnel his way out one spoon full of concrete at a time.

Grit is tough because you don’t get the psychic payoffs that come with an exciting discovery or a shift in direction. You rarely get big wins to celebrate. In fact you may never truly win. All you can do is shave a few seconds off your times and that slow inch by inch progress? It’s called winning.

 

 

Age Group FYI #26 LC 2011, June 13th

Thanks to everyone who came out to the press event Monday morning. It is very exciting for Poseidon to see the pools coming to Richmond and to see the construction under way. Keep spreading the good news and promoting Poseidon over the summer at your summer clubs as we head into the new pools.

Just a reminder that there is NO practice schedule for Friday June 17th at 6:30 due to the summer league swim meets in the area. Age Group has the option to come to the 4:30 practice with the Sr Group.

Monday’s meeting again centered on being mentally tough. In this month’s issue of Swimming World magazine there is an article titled Build a Bulletproof Brain and Swim Like Superman, which I read to the kids. I thought this was a very good article because is sums up everything we have talked about in mental preparation. In fact it sums it up in three easy tips.

1.       Mental Toughness Tip #1- You have to make training (physical and mental) more challenging and more demanding than the competition for which you are preparing.

If you were to rate your meets from 1-10 with 10 being the Olympics and 1 being a summer league meet, you must consistently train to the next number. Unfortunately, many swimmers prepare for a level 4 meet by training at level 2 or 3, and then hope that everything works out when they get ready to compete. Clearly, hope is not a recommended strategy for success.

2.       Mental Toughness Tip #2- You have to out prepare – in every aspect- every swimmer whom you will be facing in competition.

This means every aspect of you preparation must be better than that of every swimmer against whom you will race. You have to eat better, sleep better, work harder, take care of your injuries better, and manage your time better. If you know you have consistently “out-eaten”, “out-slept”, “ out-recovered”, “out-worked”, and “out-trained” your competition, you can go to the meet with the confidence you can perform at your best in every situation, every race, every time.

3.       Mental toughness Tip #3- You have to do the first two tips every day – in everything you do – in and out of the water.

Want to know the secret of mental toughness? The secret to being mentally tough is not to have to be mentally tough! Talking tough, walking tough, yelling team war-cries, and or painting your face are all good fun, but none of them are real, and none make you really mentally tough. Real mental toughness comes from one thing: preparation. Real mental toughness comes from one person: you. Real mental toughness is based on confidence…confidence that comes from knowing…knowing that you have done everything within your power to prepare to be the best of your ability every day.

 

Age Group FYI #25 2011 LC, June 5th

You may have already received the notice about the pool party on Friday at 6:15 at MAC, but just wanted to remind everyone that this is an excellent chance for the entire team to get together for some fun.

Saturday’s practice is scheduled for 6:15am to 8:15am at the YMCA.

In Monday’s meeting I talked to the kids about ways to become mentally stronger. I took several ideas from a book I just finished reading called Training Camp. I am recommending that everyone read Training Camp- A Fable About Excellence, by Jon Gordon. I do want to mention that the book takes a very religious turn at the end, and by no means am I pushing certain beliefs on anyone, but I think the initial message is a good one.

One of the chapters of the book is titled 20 Ways to Get Mentally Tough. I read through most of them leaving out those that embarked a little too much religious undertone. Here are some of them I believe will help the kids out the most.

1.       When you face a setback, think of it as a defining moment that will lead to the future accomplishment.

2.       When you encounter adversity, remember, the best just don’t just face adversity, they embrace it, knowing it is not a dead-end but a detour to something greater and better.

3.       When you face negative people, know that the key to life is to stay positive in the face of negativity, not in the absence of it.

4.       When you face the naysayers, remember the people who believed in you and spoke positive words to you.

5.       When you face critics, remember to tune them out and focus only on being the best you can be.

6.       When you fail, find the lesson in it, and the recall a time when you have succeeded.

7.       When you head into battle, visualize success

8.       When you are thinking about the past or worrying about the future, instead focus your energy on the present moment.  The now is where your power is the greatest.

9.       When you want to complain, instead indentify a solution.

10.   When your own self-doubt crowds your mind, weed it, and replace it with positive thoughts and positive self-talk.

11.     When you are tired and drained, remember to never, never, never, give up.  Finish strong in everything you do.

12.   When you are in a high- pressure situation and the game is on the line, and everyone is watching you,  remember to smile, have fun, and enjoy it.  Life is short; you only live once.  You have nothing to lose.  Seize the moment.

My hope is that the kids can use any one of these 12 tips to help improve their mental toughness throughout swimming and life.

 

Age Group FYI #24 LC 2011, May 31st

Today Tuesday May 31, 2011 we had our meeting for the week, since yesterday was a holiday. We talked about the schedule for the week which was sent out in an email (No practice Thursday PM or Saturday). We also talked about dry land for age group, which we will not have as much, due to the fact that we have been able to swim so much more with the 2 hour practices. I don’t want to over work the kids with both and feel that swimming will benefit us more. Keep checking your emails and website for any dry land training. With us missing 2 practices for the week age group has the option of attending Sr. mornings to make up for the missed practices.

The topic I covered was how to stay more hydrated. I felt this was a great topic to cover since today was the first 100 degree day of the summer. The following a link to the article I read to the kids for the meeting.

   http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/healthy/physical/basics/1014.html

The biggest problem I see with the kids is 1) not having a water bottle at practice and 2) not learning when to drink the water. They should consistently be drinking water throughout practice and not chugging it when they get or feel thirsty.

Age Group FYI #23 LC 2011, May 25

Monday marked our first practice at St. Catherine’s pool and we were very impressed in every way. To the welcome signs leading us in the right direction to the beautiful pool, to the quality of air, which allowed us to get in one of the best practices we have had since leaving ACAC.

Practice Wednesday will be from 6:30 to 8:30 at the Y. This is a slight change from the original calendar we put out. The Y has been great to work with allowing us to have this practice and not miss much more water time. We will be swimming outside and have dry land at 6:00.

Saturday we will have practice from 9:00 to 11:00 am at the Y. Again this is a time change from the original schedule. When I told the kids they were excited about sleeping in one more Saturday.

Questions about morning practice have surfaced. I am telling everyone that anyone in age group can use these practices as a way to get in their committed number of practices. Please remember that the morning practices are being held at the Y from 4:50am to 6:20am.

Monday Meeting was about RACING and how we can better prepare ourselves to race faster and tougher at meets. This is how we described RACING:

R- Readiness. Must be prepared: Stretching, hydration, warm up

A-Attitude. Always be positive and for some it helps to have a little bit of arrogance.

C-Confident and Committed. Racing more in practice builds confidence but you must be committed to racing.

I-Intensity to have a killer Instinct. Racing is intense must keep the intensity up.

N-No Fear. Can Not have a fear of Racing or the pain you will feel.

G-Guts. Add everything up and you have the guts to swim fast.

The above has never been truer as we head into a new level of training in age group with our 2 hour practices. I am excited to have the whole group together for big training group as it allows for more RACING in practice. With only one 2 hour practice under our belts we have already raised the level of intensity. Couldn’t have asked for a better to start at St. Catherine’s.

 

Age Group FYI #22 LC 2011 May 16, 2011

After tonight we only have 3 more days left at the Y with our crazy schedule and all the changes we have been through in the last 2 weeks. Next week we will be practicing at St. Catherine’s from 6:30 to 8:30. Please keep checking the website for practice changes as there are functions at St. Catherine’s that we must deal with.

Please sign up for the Spartanburg meet as we are in the process of making plans.

Monday Meeting topic was once again a topic that we revisited with a little twist to it. In sport and in life we must Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable. With the past 2 weeks being the way they have gone we have had under take this thought with a new twist. Previously we have talked about how this principle will help us in high intensity training. While that is all true for the upcoming weeks, we need to understand how it can help us now.

To take this thought to the next level we must understand that not every situation is going to be perfect. The water temperature may change or the air may not be good but through it all you can always be doing something in this sport to be moving forward. Stroke technique can always be worked on and or bad habits can fixed. Remember this quote “TO KNOW AND NOT TO DO, IS NOT TO KNOW”. If you know something and choose not to utilize what you know, then for all practical purposes you do not know it and it won’t help you. Keep in mind knowledge is power. Use it or you will lose it.

As we move forward throughout these changing times literally and figuratively remember this, you can’t get anywhere in life without mental toughness and a willingness to utilize adversity to your benefit.

 

Age Group FYI #21 LC 2011, May 10th 2011

Parents, I sent out an email earlier today about the Y and the pool, so no need to elaborate on that topic, but please keep checking the website and your email for updates. Sending this out tonight, I can tell you that all the kids prefer being outside rather than being inside.

Monday’s meeting topic was about raising the bar. Below is the article I read to the kids. It was written by Tim Conor.

From time to time everyone hits either a real winning streak or a real slump in their life. Life is about ups and downs. It is not a consistent upward rise to the top of the mountain nor is it a steady decline to the pits. It is give and take, winning and losing and acceptance of life either way. Now don't get me wrong I am not implying that you should accept losing as a way of life and give up. I am suggesting however that when you lose, if you did your best, you won't win them all. It's not that kind of world.

Raising the bar means just that: raising your self-expectations higher. People tend to get into ruts of performance. They accept their: $50,000 job, 50 million dollar business, being No two, the inevitable loss of some kind, or retirement from anywhere between 45 and 65 years of age.

I say: no way. I can change the status quo, achieve more, become better, decide to do more with less, pour it on and I can raise my personal bar to any position I choose. If do not cross the bar, it doesn't matter. Life is not about crossing the bar, it is about the thrill, joy and pleasure in trying to cross the bar. There is a distinct difference here, one that I want to ensure you understand. Having goals is important, but working toward goals is more important.

Where is your bar set?

Low enough so you can have a life filled with accomplishments?
So high that you continually stretch yourself to climb higher.
Somewhere in between: safe yet a little challenging?

Each of us can do more. I am not suggesting you become a workaholic. I love to play, relax, read, travel and do nothing. But I am also a believer in pouring it on. Most of us could accomplish a great deal more than we do. We only need to create the desire, get organized, have balance in our lives, and go for it.

Where in your life could you be accomplishing more? In your career? Personal life? Outside interests? A new hobby? A new sport?

Don't wait. The clock is ticking. Before you know it you may be too old, too tired, too bored, or too sick to pour it on. And don't worry about missing the mark or failing.

You need to fail often to succeed sooner.



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/375460

 

This is such a good topic to discuss because we were able to point out examples of the bar being raised in every aspect of their lives, from swimming to school, and what is to come in their lives from colleges to future jobs. I hope everyone will take this message and apply it to however they feel will make their life better.

 

Age Group FYI #20 2010-2011

Today was our first day at the Y, and it was a beautiful day. Many questions about what we can and can’t do at the Y are coming up daily and we will work through them as they come up.  If you have any questions about the Y and our usage of the locker rooms and or membership please direct them to Ted, he said he would handle this.

The message for the week was taken for an article out of Swimming World magazine. The article is titled The 5 “Abilities” Every Swimmer Needs. To summarize the article it can be broken down 5 points.

1. There are “5 Big” abilities that every swimmer needs; Mo- ability, Sta-ability, Flex-ability, Adapt-ability, and Me-Ability (self-belief).

2. There are many, many non-swimming activities that can enhance each of the five abilities and in turn enhance your swimming performance. A few of these activities could be Yoga, strength training, exercise classes, rock climbing, and or martial arts. Ironically must of these activities can be found at the Y.

3. Of all the “abilities” the most important one is Me-ability. With self belief and self confidence anything is possible.

4. Confidence is king and confidence comes from knowing- knowing you have done all you can do to develop the abilities in training and preparation.

5. And the best thing of all is that each of the abilities can be purchased with hard work, earned with some consistent training, and bought with a little effort! If you can afford the price, the rewards are incomparable!

 

Age Group FYI #19 LC 2011

Parents,

Today, we can officially call it the start of LC season. It is our last week at ACAC so please familiarize yourself with the summer practice schedules.  Since we will be at the Midlothian YMCA they have offered us a deal to get membership if you would like. We are suggesting it if you plan on attending morning practices before school so you can utilize the showers or if you want to use it for taking extra classes they have. Since we are at the Y, we will need to be responsible for our own equipment. I know an email went out about getting mesh bags and a kick board. I almost have everyone marked down for what they need.

Please sign up for the upcoming meets, we would like everyone to attend all the meets they can to utilize the LC water for training and racing. The Machine meet is the next one.

It will be very important to keep using the website for information regarding meets, practice schedules, and team info.

This week’s Monday meeting was about the season plan for Age Group and then Goal sheets. This season plan has a lot of wiggle room for changes based on where we will be swimming. Both of them can be down loaded by clicking here.  2011 LC Season Plan or 2011 LC Goal Sheet.

 

Age Group FYI#18 2010-11

Age Group FYI# 17 2010-11

Age Group FYI #16 2010-11

Age Group FYI #15 2010-11

Age Group FYI #14 2010-11

Age Group FYI #13 2010-11

Age Group FYI #12 2010-11

Age Group FYI #11 2010-11

Age Group FYI #10 2010-11

Age Group FYI #9 2010-11

Age Group FYI #8 2010-11

30x100 AA Results 11-2-10

30x100 VAR Results 11-2-10

Age Group FYI #7 2010-11

1500 IM Results

Age Group FYI #6 2010-11

Distance Honors Results October 20, 2010

Age Group FYI #5 2010-11

Test Set #1 5x200 IM October 12, 2010

Age Group FYI #4 2010-11

Age Group FYI #3 2010-11

Age Group FYI #2- 2010-11

Age Group Season Plan 2010-11

Age Group Goal Sheet 2010-11

Age Group FYI #1- 2010-11