Stingrays Fold, Inconnu Becomes Year-Round Swim Club

Jessica Baccante

No Stingrays means there is no longer a club in Fort St. John that’s part of the BCSSA. Though Rogers thinks there are benefits to both governing bodies, the different rules, age groups, and qualifying times between the two made it difficult to run both clubs.

According to Rogers, Inconnu swimmers, especially older ones, regularly practice more than 10 hours per week in the winter, whereas BCSSA swimmers can only practice two hours a week during that same time. So that the kids who came over from the Inconnu didn’t have an advantage over kids who only swam for the Stingrays, these year-round swimmers would compete in a separate category (OCATS) from the rest of their teammates during swim meets.

“This led to many of our local swimmers only getting to compete against their teammates from our home club since there are much fewer OCATS in the BCSSA program. This was not really a great competitive experience for the kids and it took a lot of volunteer work from parents to help out at meets that our swimmers weren't really benefiting from,” said Rogers.

“Folding it was not a decision we took lightly, but it boiled down to the benefits of the swimmers not outweighing the commitments of the parents running the club.”

No Stingrays means there is no longer a club in Fort St. John that’s part of the BCSSA. Though Rogers thinks there are benefits to both governing bodies, the different rules, age groups, and qualifying times between the two made it difficult to run both clubs.

According to Rogers, Inconnu swimmers, especially older ones, regularly practice more than 10 hours per week in the winter, whereas BCSSA swimmers can only practice two hours a week during that same time. So that the kids who came over from the Inconnu didn’t have an advantage over kids who only swam for the Stingrays, these year-round swimmers would compete in a separate category (OCATS) from the rest of their teammates during swim meets.

“This led to many of our local swimmers only getting to compete against their teammates from our home club since there are much fewer OCATS in the BCSSA program. This was not really a great competitive experience for the kids and it took a lot of volunteer work from parents to help out at meets that our swimmers weren't really benefiting from,” said Rogers.

“Folding it was not a decision we took lightly, but it boiled down to the benefits of the swimmers not outweighing the commitments of the parents running the club.”