Thank you for being interested in the Coho Swim Club! We are a part of the Deerfield Park District and were founded in 1971. Coho is run by three full-time employees of the park district and a volunteer elected Parent Board. Coho offers opportunities beyond swimming to integrate the team into the community.

First steps: 

 

Before you can join the team your swimmer must complete a tryout. 

If you have any questions about joining Coho please contact Jeff Napolski at jeff@teamcoho.org or 847-572-2626.


Register a tryout account, add your swimmer and claim a slot here:

https://myswimming.net/parent.html

Create your account, then "add a member" or a swimmer, to your account. 

**We need a Middle name or initial for USA Swimming registration**


General Tryout Information:

All tryouts are conducted at the Sachs Recreation Center:

Pool inside SRC:

In order to join the team, your swimmer must complete a tryout.

Tryouts look at 4 key skills:

  • Front crawl with side breathing
  • Backstroke with body at surface
  • If they've heard of breaststroke kick
  • Can they demonstrate a fly kick, or undulation (also called dolphin kick)

Freestyle example with side breaths:

 

 

Coho's developmental swim program is awesome. We focus on instruction, learning, and fun coupled with deliberate practice. We want our swimmers to enjoy coming to practice and we approach skill aquisition through habit, routine, and dynamic structure. We aim to instill a sense of Spirit, Character, and Pride in all participants, and we strive to assist our swimmers in becoming outstanding individuals in all aspects of life, even beyond their athletic achievements.

 

 

Most swimmers begin in our first group, Minnows:

 

General information: Minnows

 

  • Please check the Google calendar on the homepage of the website for the specific schedule, but the general practice schedule for Minnows is 5:30 pm - 6:15 pm Monday through Thursday at the Sachs Recreation Center.

    • Come early (5:20 pm), as we'll do activities on deck for about 10 minutes before getting in the water.

 

Typical Minnows Practices look like this: 

 

Dryland

In dryland, we do yoga poses, games and challenges with swimming-related topics like "streamline roll," "soft pretzel pose into a swimming pose," and "statue master." 

We use mirrors and partners to get in the habit of seeing our bodies and moving it in specific ways. This is a great time to get to know the kids in a non-pool setting and establish good listening, and habits. 

After the "question of the day," swimmers will shower and get ready to get in the water by setting up the pool and getting a kickboard. They will line up behind their lanes. 

 

Warm-up:

We normally start with a 100 IM kick review. How do you hold the board for each stroke, review what a 100 is, what an IM is, and even what the four competitive strokes are. 

Immediately after we do 2 x 25s of Position 11. Here we reinforce streamline with the 3 keys to make one successful as well as the three key ways to make position 11 (and swimming) easier. 

 

Small groups: 

Typically we split up into small groups at either end of the pool and work on short distance swimming. This is where the high focus on learning, excellence, and deliberate practice is born and fostered. After the routine of warmup we have established that "play time," or "not swimming time" is over. Like an expectant song you play on repeat, we move into "high focus time." 

During the small groups we do lots of repetition where we are exacting in our feedback and expectations. We'll do things like, 3 times, streamline, plus three strokes of freestyle with a flip, no breathing. Our goal here is to have an excellent all three things streamline, three excellent strokes that do not wobble the body and move correctly, and a flip without breathing before it. 

Coaches attempt to give feedback on every attempt and push our swimmers to more and more complicated swim motions. 

More examples: 

- 5 x SL + 5 FR + 1 breath + flip

- 3 x SL + 2 BR K

- 3 x SL (to the flags) + 3 BK (after flags)

- 3 x SL + 1 fly stroke no kick

 

Endurance and Games: 

After doing a high focus activity heavy on the instruction and learning we do a breaking up the monotony game or longer distance swim to practice what we just learned. This is where we'll do our "lap swimming" with 25's ( 1 length swims) or 50's (down and back). Our goals here are to continue the high quality effort in the short distance groups and apply it to a longer swim. 

We also do challenges or games. These are designed to encourage thinking about swimming beyond being told what to do, foster interest in personal body control, and be difficult to accomplish quickly or well. These are not always easy and are intended to stimulate their brains as much as their physical motions. 

Sometimes we also do "read the board" activities where swimmers form groups in their lanes and follow a list of choices and activities. This is to start learn how to read the board and how to get familiar with the swimming language. 

 

General information: Sharks

 

  • Please check the Google calendar on the homepage of the website for the specific schedule, but the general practice schedule for Sharks is: 6:30pm - 7:30pm Monday through Thursday at the Sachs Recreation Center

    • ​Come early (6:20pm), because we have a standard "dryland" routine we move through that changes each season. These skills are reinforcing swimming specific motions and positions that allow us to reference in the water. 

 

Typical Sharks Practices look like this: 

 

Dryland

In dryland, we do yoga poses, repetitive movements like reps in exercise, and basic workouts like plank and sit-ups. Generally, we follow a set routine for practice every day each season or 8-week cycle. Here is an example "dryland" for Sharks: 

Dryland is optional but highly encouraged as part of the routine to "start swimming" and not be in play time or hangout mode. 

After completing the dryland routine, swimmers are expected to shower, get a kickboard, and gather behind their lanes. 

 

Warm-up:

We normally start with a 100 IM kick review. How do you hold the board for each stroke, review what a 100 is, what a IM is, and even what the four competitive strokes are. Most Sharks swimmers are familiar with this routine and we may or may not spend more than a minute on review. 

We begin practice with a 100 IM KICK using the board.

 

Immediately after we do 2 x 25s of Position 11. Here we reinforce streamline with the 3 keys to make one successful as well as the three key ways to make position 11 (and swimming) easier. 

 

Next is the sharks "Question of the Day." This is a swimming related question or something about the coaches like their middle name, or where they went to high school, or what event was their best stroke, or favorite food (hint: cheeseburger). Swimmers tell coaches their answer and then after all have responded, we reveal the answer and explain why. 

If they swimmers get it right they do one activity, if they get it wrong they do a different sometimes more challenging activity (or less preferred one). 

 

The final portion of Warm-up is our opportunity to work on using the clock, reading it, and getting familiar with intervals. We generally do only 25's on the 1:00 (one minute) so as to make it consistent and easy. 

4 x 25 on 1:00 [something]

That something can be FR swim, or FR K, or a drill like 5 K in position 11 + arm stroke, or HLB w/ R. The primary focus is learning to swim in lanes with others, intervals when to leave, and some light endurance building. 

 

Small groups: 

Typically we split up into small groups at either end of the pool and work on short distance swimming. This is where the high focus on learning, excellence, and deliberate practice is born and fostered. After the routine of warmup we have established that "play time," or "not swimming time" is over. Like an expectant song you play on repeat, we move into "high focus time." 

During the small groups, we do lots of repetition where we are exacting in our feedback and expectations. We'll do things like, 3 times, streamline, plus three strokes of freestyle with a flip, no breathing. Our goal here is to have an excellent all three things streamline, three excellent strokes that do not wobble the body and move correctly, and a flip without breathing before it. 

Coaches attempt to give feedback on every attempt and push our swimmers to more and more complicated swim motions. 

More examples: 

- 5 x SL + 5 FR + 1 breath + flip

- 3 x SL + 2 BR K

- 3 x SL (to the flags) + 3 BK (after flags)

- 3 x SL + 1 fly stroke no kick

Small groups for Sharks are a bit more complicated than they were in Minnows as most swimmers are already familiar with our standard patterns and when we do new things it is typically in FLY and BR where we're teaching the more difficult strokes. 

 

Endurance and Games: 

After doing a high focus activity heavy on the instruction and learning we do a breaking up the monotony game or longer distance swims to practice what we just learned. This is where we'll do our "lap swimming" with 25's ( 1 length swims) or 50's (down and back). Our goals here are to continue the high-quality effort in the short distance groups and apply it to a longer swim. 

Sharks will do longer "Set" or series of swims that incorporate more complicated multistep skills. We'll layer in two or three different strokes to give variety and focus on different muscle groups to not overwork beginners. We'll do a mix of kicking and swimming, and attempt to aim attention during these longer "workouts" at putting into practice the skills we learned in Minnows and our small groups. 

Generally the "aerobic/endurance" component of the practice will lean heavily on the stuff we did in the small groups. For example, if we did 3 x SL + 2(11, Y, E, 11) with no breath, we may do a set of 25's in our larger endurance portion of BR arms with FR kick. Or if we worked on FLY arms, we'll do 25's where you swim 2-4 strokes of fly, then do fly kick the rest of the 25. 

 

We also do challenges or games. These are designed to encourage thinking about swimming beyond being told what to do, foster interest in personal body control, and be difficult to accomplish quickly or well. These are not always easy and are intended to stimulate their brains as much as their physical motions. 

Sometimes we also do "read the board" activities where swimmers form groups in their lanes and follow a list of choices and activities. This is to start learning how to read the board and how to get familiar with the swimming language. 

 

Residency: All-District 109, 112 & 113 residents are residents for the COHO program. This includes families living in Deerfield, Bannockburn, Riverwoods, Highland Park, Highwood, and Fort Sheridan.

 

 

 

 

We focus on helping swimmers of all ages and abilities have fun, develop friendships, set goals, and experience success in the best possible team setting. We aim to instill a sense of Spirit, Character, and Pride in all participants, and we strive to assist our swimmers in becoming outstanding individuals in all aspects of life, even beyond their athletic achievements.